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  1. 27 points
    These are the lyrics as I hear them, after about a thousand listens! [ brackets ] around what I'm not positive about. When I hear that sound I know what's coming around 39 degrees Too hot for the breeze [bees?] Grass is turning yellow Streets are slow and mellow Faucet keeps on drippin' And the clock it keeps on tickin' Swimming pool is laughing with its shiny brand new teeth Laughing at my body as it's sweltering with heat Smell of colored plastic Baking in the sun Sweet just like frustration My senses [sex is?] on the run I want your ice cream (I want it) lying in the sun I want your ice cream (I want it) melting on my tongue I want your ice cream (I want it) Whatcha waitin' for I want it Ice cream every bite All I want is more [Still working on the second verse where they're coming down the runway but the sound is so fuzzy...] [something] car [something] far Lose the space to stand in Temperature's so hot Everywhere I'm so heavy [something] [something] Til then I've ever been Swimming pool is laughing with its shiny brand new teeth Laughing at my body as its sweltering with heat Smell of colored plastic Baking in the sun Sweet just like frustration My senses (sex is?) on the run I want your ice cream (I want it) lying in the sun I want your ice cream (I want it) melting on my tongue I want your ice cream (I want it) Whatcha waitin' for I want it Ice cream every bite All I want is more And yes, it's a very Prince meets George Michael vibe, that's the first thing I said as soon as I heard it! It is SO DAMN GOOD!
  2. 25 points
    Electric energy in Brooklyn tonight! Mika is so comfortable in his skin and in his songs, and he shared that with us tonight. Some thoughts in no particular order: In the intro, there is a recording of Mika talking all about love: how love created the universe, and lit up the sun, and how the sun created all of us with its yellow light. During this recording the band is all on stage waiting, and you don't see Mika at all, and then he just runs on all at once! Red! Suit! Frilly! Shirt! CURLS!!! And Velcro Shoes???? Dear Jealousy was the second song he played (I think) -- beforehand, he talked for a bit about he hasn't been on tour in four years, and he is starting something new. To start something new, you have to start with new music, and this song was acknowledging something new...basically, how he is a "jealous bastard." 😂 Crowd reaction was great, it felt like everyone around me was either familiar with the song or caught on really quickly. The venue itself had great sound, high ceilings, and a very wide stage that meant a lot of people could get close. Mika did a good job of walking back and forth and giving energy to every corner of the room. Mika was really hamming it up, saying "this song is for my aunties..." he named all of the aunties, some of whom were here tonight, and his mother. Then he said "you'll see why I'll be getting 56 slaps in the face when you find out what song this is" -- then launched into Big Girl. The gig was also RECORDED, which was at first apparent because of the team with the huge camera who walked around filming for most of the concert. Mika also mentioned the name of an accomplished sound engineer who reached out to him about turning a show on this tour into a live album. Mika was saying he's never dropped a live album before! So this was the show that's going to be mixed into an album. When we were leaving the venue, they opened up the side door and you could see into what looked like all the sound engineers mixing right there. Setlist was almost the same as last night, with the omission of Sanremo Lots of LICM songs tonight, followed by TOOL. Plus all the new stuff! Funny, because I think those were the two albums he toured most on in the U.S. so it makes sense to stick within those tracklists. Sofia (not sure of MFC handle) gave Mika a cool jacket (I have photos below) with embroidery and patches that were relevant to the tour. He put it on and it fit perfectly! The renditions of the older songs are some of the best I've seen. Lollipop and Love Today really stand out. Lollipop, they start with a bit of a dueling pianos soundfest that resolves into what the crowd eventually recognizes as Lollipop. He had a spiel beforehand about how his mom told him to avoid the girl next door, but she didn't need to worry about the girl next door...it was the boy next door! Love Today he had the balcony and the floor wave at each other, then told us all to close our eyes and dance our hearts out because no one cares how you look. Encore was GK and a Tiny Love reprise that ended with Mika riffing off the theme of getting and staying high on a tiny love. He said "stay high!" as the last message before he went off stage. The new tracks were great, though the sound made Blue a little difficult to understand. Technically it is a very challenging song, and Mika sings most of it solo with very basic accompaniment. Very cool to see it live, and I'm looking foward to hearing it a couple more times. TOMORROW is a CLASSIC already, the chorus is so catchy and cleverly timed -- it's just doing what Mika does best: clever lyrics, interesting melody, timing that's a little different. He gave us the intro, that this song is about being "15 cm" away from someone in the back of an old Mercedes Benz and making a mistake that you may or may not regret. Pink is the color of sin. Especially when you grow up as a Catholic boy -- because pink is also the color of passion. He used this intro to talk about Origin of Love. This kind of comment is touching to see as a fan who has followed him for so long. He's so much more comfortable in his own skin and sexuality, and open in expressing that. One of the great joys of following Mika over the years is seeing him grow and process this part of his identity through music, and being able to process alongside him. He's come a long way. Show ended around 10:30pm, Mika came out around 11:30pm to sign. There was a big crowd and he must have spent about 20 minutes talking, taking photos, and autographing with everyone. He really made his way around the crowd and took time to talk to those who were at the front. Several times during the concert, he had mentioned how he hasn't been here in four years. So it seems he's making the time to get to know his fans over here. We are lucky! Some photos:
  3. 17 points
    So I fixed google translation : My mother's obsession: that I am the best. She's always afraid of others pulling me down " An interview with Marc-Olivier Fogiel MIKA Marc-Olivier Fogiel. In your new album, "My Name is Michael Holbrook", your name in the civil registry, your mother sings. She appears on the cover, appears in the clip "Tiny Love" and in photo on stage ... Why is she so present? Mika. My mother built me. She had in mind a "destination" and she told herself that I had to reach it at all costs. Today, I am grateful to her. This need to recognize her sacrifice and the intensity of our bond, I had not felt before. Your mother wanted to save you? She saved me. For her, I had a lot of qualities but that put me a little at risk. She always told me, "Either you'll be successful and you'll be happy, or you'll have a lot of problems." It's strange to hear your mother say that when you're a child. There was no alternative. Hence a huge pressure. How did she say that to you? In a sweet or in a tough way? Tough. But at the same time with a kind of duality. Because, on the other hand, she was extremely tender, maternal, protective. I was fired from school, I truly had problems. Instead of becoming a victim, I had to work and grow up much faster. Did you understand then that it was for your good? It seemed unfair to me. Why did I have to do three hours of music a day while my sisters were not? How many times have I been unable to sing for half an hour straight because I was just crying! She forced me, "I'm staying here until you stop, you're going to sing me that song right now without crying." Today, you speak of a need to thank her ... I would have been terribly wrong not to pay a tribute to her while she is still alive, by my side. One of the first songs I wrote for this album is "Tiny Love": it talks about surpassing oneself, about going as high as we can with the means we have to give ourselves the feeling of having value. And that's what my mother taught me. By the time I finished "Tiny Love", she learned she had a serious heart problem. She had to be operated on within 24 hours. The same evening, I was on a plane to join her in Dubai. As I sat down beside her, I felt invaded by a form of chaos linked to this coincidence; the day I finished this song, the disaster happened. I thought, "What if the operation went wrong?" Well, it went well, but there were complications. My mother was bedridden with gaping wounds on her legs. Yet she wanted to fight, because her heart had not stopped. She decided to walk again and do everything to get there. She was supposed to draw the costumes for a TV show I was showing in Milan. I formally forbid her to come. Now, the day of the first rehearsal, in Italy, she shows up! In a wheelchair, accompanied by a nurse and one of my sisters. And she said to me, "Here, I came to work." Even sick, she could not help but accompany you? Even if it was less present, she took risks ... I thought: my mother goes through hardships, life is difficult, so I'm going to dedicate myself to writing. I want to make a beautiful album, a kind of medicine, not only for me but for my family. Something that warms the heart. because you were touched in the heart? Because I was touched by the fragility of life. Have you thought of the worst? If anything happened to my mother, if I lost her, I was afraid of not being able to work. I would have said to myself: "It was me who hurt her by exhausting her, I killed her." She is begged to stop and she takes a plane to cross the world. For who? For me. How would you define your links? Very, very intense. It can ignite quickly. When people hear us, they are often shocked by our harshness: it is honesty because there is nothing to hide. But it's always guided by love. Your mother finally recovered from her heart problems ... Yes, and she said to me, "Now I'm changing my hips, so I will not be in a wheelchair anymore and I can follow you on the next tour." She does it for you or for her? She wanted to continue working. Being mobile was very important. And everything is going well. Life goes on. Until this summer 2018. I wrote half of the album and we find a house in Italy, we set up a studio. She comes to see how it goes. I notice that she is a little hard with me, not too much, just a little. But hey, I keep going Following my birthday, we are meeting in a hotel in Sardinia. And I realize that she is very worried, very tired. My sisters are wondering too. I'm leaving for a concert. T hey make her have examinations. After the scan, I get a message: there is a big mass in her brain and I must immediately go back to Milan. There begins this new phase, this new fight. She has a brain tumor ... A very important tumor. That's why she had this strange behavior. We decided to have her operated at La Pitié-Salpêtrière. We are told that she is suffering from an extremely aggressive brain cancer. From that moment, the life, the album, everything is paused. My sisters, my brother, my father and I, we put ourselves in a bubble, we hide. After the operation, we go back to this little house in Italy. We close the door and stay together. Then the chemotherapy begins in France. And there, life must resume. My life must resume. Does this mean that you continued to create as the earth collapsed? Yes, I realized how much she was a big part of my foundation ... I did not know that much before. I then I stop working a little, I take a step back. But one morning I get an e-mail from my mother, who says [silence]: "You do not answer me. You judge all my interventions around your work displaced. You're wrong. Who more than me cares about your success? I'm old now, about to die from a brain tumor, but all I can tell you is that none of this I do for myself. All I wish is that you always stay the best. I never taught you to be trivial. Now, today, I fear that you are under too much pressure that pulls you to banality. It leads to anonymity and self-satisfaction. Talk to me before it's too late. Why do not you take the time to come see me"? How did you react? It was crazy, was not it? I got into a black rage. Through my restraint, I showed her my affection, my respect. A few days later, I realized that this fury that I felt was not directed against her but against me, because I was wrong. I realized that it was the same process as when she provoked me so that I could make it through when I was 10. Rather than compose, you did not need to spend more time with her, enjoying her presence? Me, I thought about today, and my mother was terrified by tomorrow. Not for her, for me, and for us, for the family. She thought that the effect of her illness on the people she loves, this pause, this time that was devoted to her rather than the construction of the future, was terrifying. And you started working again? It compelled me to throw myself into the emotion rather than confining myself to this kind of misplaced modesty. It compelled me to be as authentic as possible. She came to "The Voice", we saw you at a Christian Louboutin party. she was there, solid, beautiful. Normally, with this disease, it's impossible ... She is in her sixth chemotherapy session and is working on the tour, on styling. She goes out, goes to the opera, to the theater ... My mother absolutely wants to live life to the fullest. And it's dangerous. This disease causes a lot of discomfort. It's very risky for the brain and the heart. We are trying to calm her, but she absolutely wants to go out. She is impossible to stop. Did you get this energy from her? She inspires me. The starting point of the album is the illness of my mother and the whirlwind of anxieties and emotions that resulted. It put us in a sort of urgency: we have to create. In fact, she asked you to become an adult . Have you become in two years? We become adults when we are faced with the fear of losing someone. At that moment, one is obliged to open one's eyes, to open one's heart. This can happen at age 15, it can happen at age 60. This transformation means that we inevitably stop relying on others. On the contrary, it is the others who can rely on us. And that's the point where you at now? Yes, we are here now. Your album exudes gaiety, yet your sister Paloma, who was born with a disability and then miraculously survived a fall in 2010, sings too. And we guess other dramas ... [Silence.] Yes, indeed, dramas that threatened to further destabilize my family and cause even more sadness for my mother. In the face of these catastrophes, we have always refused to allow ourselves to be defeated. On the contrary, we have become even stronger. It's all your story ... Our family was built on this spirit of resistance, reinvention against loss, destruction. My mother calls this " blooming, flowering ". This summer, I was about to deliver the final recording of the album, it was my birthday and I decided to take a three-day vacation. I'm in the car, on the road to my hotel, when she calls me furiously: "You did not want to be with me because it's hard to be with me! Did not you think it would be nice to come back for your birthday"? "I say angrily, " I just wanted a break. Why are you doing this to me"? We fight, I get to the hotel, I go up to my room. She had it filled with nine bunches of flowers! I find a drawing of my flowered head and a little letter in which she wrote: "Remember, may your head always bloom." So what… I am filled with joy. I call her back... she does not answer. I insist. My sister responds, yells, gives the phone to my father who puts the speaker on and says, "Talk to your mother, talk to your mother". She was having a stroke. And I, rather than being there, by her side, I'm in my room, trying to thank her, to calm her. We reassured her, we hospitalized her. When I hung up, I looked at all these flowers ... All day she had only thought of these flowers. That day, I made the decision never to react impulsively again. Because now, in our relationship, the slightest gesture counts. The next morning, I made the final recording and told myself it was a good thing to have her sing it. Why ? Because I gave her all her power . I put in the light this woman from the shadows. When we know that she recorded this passage just three weeks after her brain surgery and the day before the start of her chemotherapy sessions, we realize that she has the power. She has the last word, her and my sister Paloma. They are similar. How important is it for you to speak about it the way you're doing it? The only things that matters in life are the people we love and the stories we tell about them. In the old days, I was discreet when I talked about intimate questions. Now, I understand that these difficult things must be tackled and made into beautiful things. In the song "Paloma", there are these two lines: "I found you fighting in the darkness" "And there was beauty in that too". It seems incredible: where is the beauty in someone dying? And yet, I promise you there is beauty. A horrible beauty, wild, murderous, but beauty anyway. There is also beauty in your mother's illness ... And there is also beauty in the way our family, and my mother in particular, manages such a frightening situation. When you project yourself, are you still afraid? [Silence.] Yes, it's inevitable. But this fear, I compensate with a feeling of liberating gratitude for the love of life that the disease has injected into our family. Is it complicated for your companion to find a place in the middle of all this? Andy has a very strong relationship with my mother. It was with him that I revealed my homosexuality to my family. We were sitting in the kitchen. My mother said to me: "In the end, what difference does it make? I always knew it. If you did not know it, that's your problem". [Laughs] There was a moment when Andy and I separated briefly. And she fought for two months to bring him back. The album is called "my Name Is Michael Holbrook". We could add "Son of Joannie and Michael", right? Yes, I am Mika, son of Joannie and Michael. And I'm proud to be part of this lineage. Interview Marc-Olivier Fogiel https://docs.google.com/document/d/1Z_nSrn7owWV4HO_FqJFqdJpXcOMd5Yvc3zLjLX7WMeo/edit?usp=drivesdk
  4. 16 points
    Only when I see a new post here, hoping it might be actual news... (Hello to everyone who clicked on here for the same reason! )
  5. 15 points
  6. 13 points
  7. 13 points
    Anybody wants to listen to Mika's new music? IG Story from today 1924807385060569491_179779999.mp4
  8. 12 points
    Thanks, Eriko! It reminds me of a Prince's song, I don't know why Edit: I know, it reminds me of Cream, even the choreography:
  9. 12 points
    Yes. I think it's a little spontaneous gift for MFC. Everyone of the old MFCers knows what it means. They tried to catch it on camera in 2007, but all he said when the camera was on was "no chicken tonight!". And now, 12 years later, we got it on video from him.
  10. 12 points
    So, Deb has contacted Team Mika about it and got the reply that it's NOT true.
  11. 12 points
    Things get better today. Little by little everything is solved.
  12. 11 points
  13. 11 points
    Vanity Fair Italia 17 settembre 2019 https://www.vanityfair.it/music/storie-music/2019/09/17/mika-canzoni-ice-cream-nuovo-album-gossip-vita-privata-intervista-vanity-fair Mika: «Il dramma che mi ha allontanato da mio padre, le pressioni di mia madre, il dolore di mia sorella» La crisi è arrivata dopo dodici anni di successo internazionale. Così, prima di scrivere il suo nuovo album, la popstar ha fatto pace con il suo passato. E lo racconta in esclusiva a Vanity Fair «Volevo prendere le distanze da Mika. Per spiegare devo tornare alla mia storia familiare, la stessa da cui sono partito quattro anni fa quando sono andato in crisi. Usare il nome dell’anagrafe mi ha permesso di rivedere i rapporti con la mia famiglia con uno sguardo diverso, più adulto e coraggioso». My Name is Michael Holbrook – titolo del nuovo album di Mika, e il primo verso di Tiny Love, la canzone che apre questo disco, a quattro anni da No Place in Heaven – nasce da una crisi creativa e da una rivelazione, come il musicista spiega in una coraggiosa intervista esclusiva al nostro giornale, che gli dedica la copertina del numero in edicola da mercoledì 18 settembre. La rivelazione, racconta, è avvenuta due anni fa in un cimitero della Georgia, nel Sud degli Stati Uniti, davanti alle tombe degli antenati su cui era inciso il cognome paterno, Penniman, e in alcuni casi anche i suoi due nomi di battesimo, Michael Holbrook. «Non sapevo da che parte cominciare, ero in piena crisi creativa, nel senso che non avevo niente da dire. Così, come sempre in queste situazioni, mi sono detto che dovevo buttarmi verso l’ignoto, e per me l’ignoto è la famiglia di mio padre. Vedere il mio nome su tutte quelle tombe mi ha esaltato, è stato bello conoscere quel pezzo della mia identità ancora inesplorato. Ho sentito il bisogno di difendere le mie radici e ho cominciato a scrivere: My Name is Michael Holbrook, I was born in 1983. Mi chiamo Michael Holbrook, sono nato nel 1983». Il distacco dal padre, Mika rivela per la prima volta, avvenne quando lui era bambino: «Avevo sette anni. Mio padre, consulente finanziario, era stato preso in ostaggio in Kuwait nell’ambasciata americana. È tornato sette mesi dopo, completamente cambiato. Prima era papà, poi era Mike: non riuscivamo più a chiamarlo papà, quell’uomo magro con la barba, che aveva vissuto cose fortissime, noi figli non lo riconoscevamo più». Quel trauma coincise con «un tracollo economico, abbiamo perso la casa, con i creditori che venivano a pignorarci i mobili. Così ci siamo trasferiti a Londra dove abbiamo vissuto in un bed and breakfast per due anni. Dovevamo ricostruire la nostra vita da zero. È in quel momento che tutti i miei problemi esplodono, su tutti la dislessia, e poi l’insegnante violenta e l’espulsione da scuola». E a quel punto, spiega, nasce Mika il musicista: «Mia madre viene da me e mi dice: ok, adesso tu vai a lavorare; o sarai un fallimento totale o un grande successo; se fallisci, uno come te non può che finire in prigione. Non so perché lo diceva, oggi può sembrare una frase buffa, ma è stata l’ossessione della mia vita. Lo spauracchio del fallimento ha cominciato a perseguitarmi da quando ero bambino. Mia madre mi mette sotto con il canto: quattro ore di esercizio al giorno. Non voleva la popstar: per me voleva il successo, che per lei significa coltivare un talento creativo, trovare soddisfazione nell’espressione artistica, che è come un superpotere che nessuno può toglierti e che ti dà la vera libertà. Ma la mia nuova vita di allenamento costante mi ha allontanato ancora di più da mio padre. Perché a quel punto ero diventato un progetto: il progetto di mia madre». Non si è mai sentito sfruttato «perché sapevo che era quello il mio futuro. Mia mamma aveva riconosciuto il talento in me». Ma la responsabilità è stata pesante: «Mia madre accettava lavori in tutta Europa, anche quando non ci venivano pagati il viaggio e l’albergo. E così io, lei e le mie sorelle Jasmine e Paloma ci trovavamo a dormire nella nostra vecchia Toyota Previa, fuori dal teatro in cui avrei dovuto esibirmi. Il progetto Mika è stato uno sforzo collettivo, di tutta la famiglia. Una pressione fortissima, che sento ancora oggi, ogni giorno della mia vita. Mia sorella Paloma, per esempio, avrebbe sempre voluto fare l’attrice, ma non ha mai potuto farlo perché è nata con una semi paralisi alla parte sinistra del corpo. Per lei sono un punto d’orgoglio ma anche motivo di tristezza». Una canzone del nuovo album è dedicata proprio a lei, e alla tragedia vissuta nove anni fa, che Mika ci racconta per la prima volta. «Paloma fumava alla finestra, ma siccome non ha molto equilibrio per via della semi paralisi, è caduta giù dal quarto piano, e cadendo è rimasta infilzata in una cancellata. Mi hanno chiamato, ero l’unico familiare a Londra. Mi dicono: vada a salutare sua sorella, morirà, non c’è niente da fare. Mi avvicino, era una scena terribile. Le dico: ciao Paloma. E lei: puoi dire a questi stronzi di lasciarmi in pace, visto che devo alzarmi? Così guardo la dottoressa: mi scusi, ma questa non muore. Visto che non potevano semplicemente sfilarla, hanno segato il cancello e l’hanno portata via ancora con le aste che le trafiggevano il corpo». Oggi, spiega Mika nell’intervista, chiama suo padre «Pa»: «“Daddy” non riesco». Ma il rapporto è stato recuperato, anche grazie all’introspezione da cui è nato il nuovo album. Con un epilogo a sorpresa, però: «In quel cimitero a Savannah ho visto la parte della mia vita che non aveva niente a che vedere con mia madre, con la mia carriera, con la Toyota Previa. Una via d’uscita finalmente. In albergo mi sono messo a scrivere Tiny Love, poi è arrivata la telefonata che ha cambiato tutto. È mio padre che dice: devi venire qui a Dubai, tua mamma sta molto male, ha un problema al cuore, deve fare un intervento e rischia la vita. Come una punizione, nel momento in cui tentavo di emanciparmi da mia madre e dalla mia famiglia, quella telefonata mi ha riportato a casa». In un brano dell’album, Tiny Love Reprise, cantano la madre e Paloma: «È un messaggio verso il futuro: facciamo pace con il passato, anche con la paura. Questa è la vita e noi abbiamo il nostro tiny love, il nostro amore piccolo piccolo. Ho iniziato con l’idea che il personaggio di Mika, la mia musica erano stati presi da me contro la mia volontà. Poi ho capito che non era vero, che non è stata tutta una costruzione di mia madre, l’ho voluto io. Ho fatto pace con gli ultimi 12 anni. Perché l’unico modo che conosco per vivere ed esprimermi è creare musica, scrivere, esibirmi. Senza questo non esisto».
  14. 11 points
    I did a translation into Polish for my website. Here is a transaltion from Polish into English. Sorry if any meanings are missed. Didier Varrod talks with artists in a rather specific atmosphere - this is not just a radio studio, but rather a space reminiscent of a café. This episode includes Mika, Jeanne Cherhal, Cocoon, Terrenoire, Nelson Beer, Arthur Ely and Clio. The interview with Mike was the first, but he also commented on the interviews with other guests. Here are the most interesting fragments of the interview: Didier: For the first time in our program, we will hear what Mika tells us. His name is Michael Holbrook. Born in 1983. Sometimes these are two sentences that define us and save us life. Good evening, Mika. I am very happy that you are with us today. This is our first meeting. Now, when I met so many artists, we rarely see a guest who is in the program for the first time. How do you do? Mika: Very good. At the same time, I must admit that I am very tired. I did not think there was such a nice atmosphere here. We are surrounded by so many people. As if it was a radio program during the festival. This is very rare. Radio for artists can be annoying. You have to get up at five, six in the morning. And we finish around eight in the evening. We are very isolated between various radio stations and we repeat the same information constantly. Here it is different: we are surrounded by people who sit next to us, drink drinks. 😧 We will try not to repeat the information, but we will try to talk about what is related to the new album. We know that everything began with the search for your own identity. In fact, it's nothing new, because I have the impression that from the beginning of your career there is the subject of identity, searching for who you really are. And when you find it out, you will stop singing. So that's good news. M: Absolutely. We are responsible for that. We are artists, composers, musicians. I think that every guest invited here today asks homself the same questions when composing a song: who we are, what we want, what we like, what our desires are. Yes, I always asked myself who I was to understand who I would become in the future. But each time the situation is a bit different. And this time too, the situation is different. 😧 Artists usually choose a pseudonym - stage name. You took half of your name, half ofyour identity. You did not invent something that did not exist. M: It was not even a choice. My mother is a Lebanese, an father is an American. My father is WASP (White Anglo-Saxon Protestant). I was born in Beirut, where my family went in connection with my father's work. My father was born in Jerusalem, he grew up in Cairo, Washington and many other places because his father was a diplomat. So his identity was very twisted. My mother also had an interesting story. She was born when her mother was 16 years old. And her father was 60 years old. He was a Syrian, she was a Lebanese. When she went to New York, she did not speak English. And then she gave birth to my mother. My parents met twice and then they got married. My mother decided to leave America. I was born as the third child. There are five of us. My family comes from the city of Savannah, Georgia. There was a certain tradition there. Father begged my mother: name your son Michael Holbrook Penniman Junior. And if he ever has a son, he will be called Michael Holbrook Penniman III. My mother then agreed, but one and a half hours after my birth she said she did not like the name and her son would be called Mika. So I'm Mika from the moment I was born. And this Mika became an artist. Only recently, watching the changes in my family, in my surroundings, I decided to look at this part of my life related to America. I started searching for my identity and topic for new songs. 😧 Often people like to sing this song: "last night DJ saved my life" (yesterday evening DJ saved my life). In my case, the DJ often saved my life. For you there are words. M: That's true. I love words. People think that I am ... that I would call myself a "musical prostitute". I'm really seduced by music. It can be any style: rap, classical music, Wagner, or Dolly Parton. When I hear music, I feel seduced. I love music. But I must admit that when I'm working on a song, I'm obsessed with words and images. I rely on images. 😧 And those first words of the song "My name is Michael Holbrook" saved your life. They introduced you with the creation process. Because you've been on the verge of panic before. It was the white card syndrome. M: Yes, this syndrome is the worst thing that can happen to the person who creates it. It was not even panic. It was worse. Complacency. It was a strange feeling. I was looking for a point from which I could start. I took my dogs to the car and I drove to Savannah Georgia. I visited the Bonaventure cemetery. 😧 It's a bit strange to visit the deads. M: I did not think about it. But cemeteries are beautiful. I visit them often. For example, I recently went to Venice. And I did not want to visit the cathedral or the palace. I went to see the Island of the Dead. Diaghilev, Stravinsky is buried there ... So I went there (Savannah) and discovered that a large part of the cemetery was reserved for my family. For the Penniman family. And all men were named Michael, Holbrook, William and Frederick. And I thought it was part of me. This is a place where cotton fields once were, slaves. I who was born in Beirut and had to face another part of myself. I was a little lost. And when I returned home, I sat down to the piano and unknowingly played .... My name is Michael Holbrook I was born in 1983 ... and bam! 😧 And this is how one sentence can save a life. Death, asses, Eros, Euthanatos, everything is also included in the song from the album, which will be released soon. ("Ice Cream") 😧 From the information I have, I imagine that your new album could be illustrated by these songs (Didier plays fragments of various songs, including George Michael, Maxime Leforestier, Aldebert, Alain Souchan, Aertha Kitt, and Fiona Apple) Mika: This is an illustration of my whole life. My childhood, especially my growing time and adult life. These are songs that are very important to me. I remember that when I first listened to Fiony Apple's "Paper Bag" song, I became crazy about every detail. To the extent that I hired a drummer who you hear here to play on my first album. This is Matt Chamberlain. D; Good evening, Jeanne Cherhal. It looks like Fiona Apple also has an impact on your new album. Jeanne: Yes, exactly. Mika mentioned Matt Chamberlain. I met him. I really wanted him to play on my new album. My favorite album is her (Fiona's) second album "When the Pawn". There are two drummers there: Jim Keltner and Matt Chamberlain. And I managed to have both! M: Really? It must have cost you a lot! J: It costs a little. He's an American drummer. M: It's a different culture. You have to explain what is going on. J: He works very fast. M: He works fast. But you have to pay for his assistant. You have to pay for a truck that goes next to the studio. I was in Matt's truck. He probably had about forty sets inside. J: I was in his recording studio. We recorded there. But it is true that there was plenty of equipment there. It's impressive. D; But let's go back to the illustration ... J: let's finish the drummers' history. M: Everyone falls in love with drummers. Everyone wants to go to bed with a drummer. D; Really? Mika: Of course. D; Because they are well built? M (laughing): No. They are the easiest. J: What do we learn here? D; "I Want Your Sex" by George Michael. Did you want to throw in a little of George Michael or INXS, Michael Hutchence in your first single? M: Yes, this sensuality that raises the temperature. I wondered if we were allowed to do so. Why not? And when I wrote words to "Ice Cream", which are full of images ... of sensuality, carnality... I asked myself if I could dare. But in the end, it's just a song. Why wonder at all? Do it. If it is beautiful, no matter what the text is about. If it's beautiful, then you can do it. You can talk about everything if you keep your elegance. This is our artistic code. J: I agree with you. Taboo does not exist. Everything is a matter of form. D; In my musical illustration there were songs like "Mon Pere est hero" and "My Heart Belongs is Daddy". Is your father a hero? M: He is a quiet hero, almost invisible. But he is very present. He is still with my mother. And probably even at the moment both listen to this program. Yes, my father is a hero. My mother can dominate. I come from a matriarchal family. So all women dominate. I have many mothers. I also work with my sisters. So my father kept to the back. But he was always present in our lives. And I'm more and more fascinated by him. When I was 25, I could not appreciate what he was like. But now, at 35, I see his advantages much more easily. I used to be almost blind. It takes time to create bonds ... the ties between son and mother are more evident. The ties between son and father are more complicated. I think so. D; You are 36 years old. M: I am 35 years old. But age is not important to me. D; So you are 35 years old and in 4-5 years you may be able to release a CD about forty years old man. This is a reference to Jeanne Cherhal's new song "L'An 40", which we played for the first time today at 5:40 in France Inter. J: Really? I was still sleeping! 😧 Charles Peguy wrote: "40 years is the age when we become who we are" ...... .. The conversation is about Jeanne Charhel's style of play on the piano. We hear a fragment of a work from the program dedicated to the 20th anniversary of the death of the French artist Barbara. D; We just talked about drummers. This style of piano playing ... M: That is wonderful. Yes, I have been listening to this when you were talking. It is beautiful. D; In addition, you love Barbara. M: I love Barbara! I learned about her thanks to my friend Doriand. For a month I listened only to her recordings. From morning to evening. It was an icon ... When I first met Brian May (from The Queen), he explained something to me. He said: "Everyone was wrong. Freddy Mercury played the piano like a drummer. He was the main drummer of The Queen. " I do not know what their drummer thought about it. But that was it. This drums-like playing attracted us. Especially at concerts. Not necessarily on the discs, but definitely on stage. J: That is what we imagined with Bashar (the talk about the song heard). We took the piano for the drums. ......... .. D to Jeanne: You talk a lot about strong women. Christine (Chris) also belongs to such. What does this mean to you? J: It's above all a woman who is in harmony with her femininity. A woman who wants to have her place in society and does not have to apologize for that .... I have the impression that for some three years we have been experiencing the return of a great wave of feminism ... since #metoo. I am glad that 19-20-year-old women are much more aware and active than we were at their age. I mean egalitarian, intelligent feminism. D; "Feminite feminin". And what do you think about it, Mika? M: I absolutely agree with Jeanne. I also like the term "feminite feminin". Because a strong woman can manifest in very diverse forms. A strong woman is also expressed through gentleness. It can be a mother who works from morning to evening, who raises children and treats it as her job. There are so many different mothers, so many different women. So many artists, businesswomen. The conversation comes down to the subject of the word "female" used by Mike. But this is a purely linguistic matter and it is difficult to capture its meaning in other languages. M: I grew up in a women's environment. I've mentioned it before. D; Are women in your matriarchal world strong? M: Of course. They are very different. My aunts, my grandmother, who was like a viper. A delicious viper. She happened to bite. She was an amazing, strong woman. She had her own unique color. And even if there was a period when I hated it, the color was special. There are also women and girls in my family that are more gentle. I never generalized when it comes to women. Maybe I was raised in special conditions. But now I think it was a great privilege. ......... .. D; Mika, has your participation in The Voice over the past few years created a similar field of action as in the creation process? M: No, this is something else. There is an artistic side in it, of course, but ... D; Is this also the search for identity? Passing it on to your own children or young people wanting to show you their own world? M: With some of them yes, but notwith everyone. Most of them think I'm crazy and aggressive and I'm just there to bother them. But I think that what you said is very interesting. The artistic process in The Voice, which is based on coaching, is the whole story. This is not an easy task. Really. When you sit in this red chair, it is not easy to speak, to find an explanation, not to change yourself in front of the camera. And it all happens in a very commercial context. This is TF1, in "prime time" and you have to stay yourself. Nelson Beer (another guest): I would like to know how much you rely on the scenario. M: There is no scenario. It has never been. Only for Nikos. Ab-so-lut-ly we do not have a scenario. Of course, there is an edition process. Otherwise, the episode would last three and a half hours. In other countries, everything is prepared. They have ipads and small earphones in which the prodction suggests what to say. We have nothing. Nothing. Nothing. And so it is from the beginning. The producers understood that in this way the program is more credible. D; Mika, if you want to stay with us, feel yourself invited. If you must go now, you are free. Make yourself at home. In any case, the album will be released in September? M: No, in October. October the 4th. D; Ah, so we have to wait a little longer. M: Yes, you have to wait a bit, but in the meantime new things will appear. D; Are you happy? M: Very. I understand that what I do is a great privilege. Writing songs is a zone where I feel really happy. And even if I'm a bit pessimistic by nature, when something beautiful happens to me, I am delighted and surprised every time. I will stick to it. I am not afraid to look into the future, because I see that life offers me a lot of beautiful things. ........
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    It's a very long story. MFC is for all ages so since its beginning some fans started using the word as a coded word meaning something only adults do and at that time Mika used to read MFC so he knows what chicken means for MFCers. And he started playing a game with a fan (You saw her video) She was trying to film him saying "No chicken tonight' and he always said it when the camera was not on but finally she managed to record him saying it. So making Mika laugh with chicken is a big tradition for us and when I found a singing dancing chicken I brought it to his concerts until I could show it to him and he laughed a lot but he refused to take it. He even got a huge plastic chicken from Asian fans once. And now it's his turn to make us laugh with his video as " I feel like chicken tonight" coming from him is both hilarious and sweet because it's part of our MFC tradition to feel naughty and laugh whenever we cook chicken and it's the same for him
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    I was listening to this song today and thought about what he said about discipline and also that he managed to describe that very well. The amount of love young musicians have for music must be enormous, so they have the discipline to continue day after day to be good enough to be professional musicians. That gives such a literal meaning for "the sound of my love for you". The music they make is literally the sound of their love. Then there's the symbolic meaning which is quite poetic actually. A lovely thought. I really like it when songs grow this way the more I listen to them.
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    Okay so here I come! This is little christmas tree standing in my room This is the one standing in the main room And this is christmas tree from my classroom with ornaments made by my pupils
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    Mika will be a guest at the Vanity Fair stories in Milan the 24th of November 2018 at the Palazzo Cinema Anteo. https://www.facebook.com/6006248039/posts/10156168290048040/
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  23. 10 points
    In the press conference in Milan he said that it's about the addiction of a friend of his, who had a relapse. He wrote this song to explain the pain and the darkness of this situation, both for the person and for those around them, writing that God is in everything to stress out the fact that we still can find light in the hardest things. With this story in mind, "is that why you let the devil in?" makes total sense. Unfortunately I'm not quoting him, I can't find the stories anywhere, but it's more or less what he meant. I'm gonna try to look for them tomorrow, so at least I can give you a proper translation!
  24. 10 points
    I wasn’t sure if I was gonna even queue much for this since in the morning I wasn’t feeling great and even pondered asking if someone wanted to trade a balcony seat for my floor ticket and I’d pay them the difference. But I finally got up and started getting ready around 10:30 or so, then my roommate Yang messaged me that the queue wasn’t long yet so I’m like screw it, I’ve gotta go queue or I’ll regret it! The day was lovely and warmer than the day before and I had a fun time with the Mika fans again, including exploring a pharmacy with Naomi and Rose, and walking to get poutine with Stephanie and Mélanie and just generally chatting with folks. Once doors opened Yang got held up getting in so was separated from us then someone pushed in front of her, put otherwise that was the only kerfuffle that I’d heard about. I got a spot front row again just a tad right of his piano. Over the 4 gigs Kiesza had grown on me (her type of music just isn’t what I usually listen to), but now I especially dig Giant In My Heart. During You’re The Best I was filming a little bit and she spotted me, and pointed at me when she sang “you’re the best”. ❤️ Since I’ve more often than not been on the other side of the piano I used this opportunity to take several videos of him playing. Mika opened with Ice Cream again then Dear Jealousy (still the best song ever!). /extreme fangurl mode activated/ He knelt down on center stage during Big Girl and I had a clear view of his cheek and his jaw and his throat from the side and all of a sudden I was really struck by how perfect it is. Like obvs I’ve seen him from the side before (actually I had quite an unhealthy obsession with that region for some years!) but I guess it’s been a while since I focused on that specific detail cuz DAYYYYUMMMMM! Ofc I then took like 20 photos as he sang and not a single one does justice to him! I’m serious, like, how can one side of a face be so so striking?! Ofc, the front part isn’t too bad either 😛 /end extreme fangurl mode/ I didn’t film Lollipop but I hope someone got a good video of him as he was singing & playing piano because he was making funny faces and otherwise being adorable. At first he forgot the lyrics to Popular Song, but quickly recovered. The set list was the same as the night before, yes Elle Me Dit but no Sanremo or Tomorrow. A little girl at the left end of the stage had a sign written in French. He went and looked at it, then went back again later and read some more, then a few different times I saw him doing some dancing or smiling or singing for her and he took the sign and put it in his piano. Could anyone read what it said? During Elle Me Dit he pulled her up on stage. Poor girl seemed a bit nervous and in awe but did great. It was so adorable! I hope someone got a video of the amazing moment for her. He whispered a lot in French at the beginning of Love Today while on the floor. I don’t know what he said but it was sexy af, even before he started humping the floor. I hadn’t yet filmed the finale, Tiny Love/Stay High, so I decided to do that this time, the last time I’ll see him in who knows how long. Of course my phone cut off the video after one & a half “we’re gonna stay HIIIIIIIIIIGH”s cuz it’s memory was too full. Ooh I could’ve smashed my phone right then and there if I hadn’t more important things to do! We gathered outside afterward in the alley at the back hoping he’d come out to greet us all, and there were many! Again I was nervous he wouldn’t come out and even if he did that I’d get caught too far from him and wouldn’t even be able to say thank you to him. But they lined us up along a wall in a much appreciated fashion and all of a sudden he was out! SUCH RELIEF!!! The security told us only autographs, no pictures! I used Yang’s phone to film him signing her NPIH magazine edition (in two places!) but it was so dark all you can see is his hand writing thanks to the security guy’s flashlight, then she filmed me (it was too dark to see I think, but the audio is clear) as I told him that I had nothing for him to sign, just a gift for him. OH MY GOD I WAS SO NERVOUS, I’M SURPRISED AN ACTUAL SENTENCE FORMED! He said thank you, then looked at it and once he saw what it was he seemed so happy and said he didn’t have the book yet and told me thank you again, and I’m like THANK YOU and blurted out can I please have a hug even though I don’t think anyone else had really asked for a hug. When he said yes my brain stopped working but my body took over. I remember his arm around me but I can’t recall feeling myself touching him at all. It took 14 gigs and what like 7 meetings with him to finally work up the nerve to ask him for anything other than his scribble. Afterward my heart was still pounding up in throat. Even tho so many of us were there he stopped for everyone, talking to those who could form words and signing things. It was all very orderly and couldn’t have gone much better. He thanked us all and said some lovely stuff to the group which hopefully someone filmed to share. He really is the best! I know I say that a lot, but yeah. He is magical, enthralling, gorgeous, talented and all that fun stuff, but he’s also just as kind and generous and thoughtful ❤️ Ugh f*ck me, he’s making me a bit mooshy on the plane just thinking about everything.
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    Enjoy this Sunday with this sweet voice
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    I wouldn't have counted this sculpture to the Mika world, if they hadn't posted those hashtags. But the post is about the sculpture, not the car, and on a closer look, that sculpture does look somewhat Mika-ish. This combination of colourful bricks and gold, the reference to food / cooking (spoon & bowl) could well be something out of Mika's mind. A part of the album artwork maybe? Didn't he have some book about menu cards for inspiration? But Peasant wedding...? somehow it doesn't make sense yet. It does make me curious though and I'm sure that was their intention.
  28. 10 points
    At least he no longer thinks he's pregnant. It's just sex with basslines.
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    @Kumazzz Each week "Le Monde" interviews a celebrity starting from a key moment of their lives. This week the singer explains how music became something obvious in his life, between Beirut, Paris and London, but always surrounded by his family and friends. Singer-songwriter-composer of an euphoric pop music, Mika has sold more than 10 millions of records since the success of his first album, Life in Cartoon Motion. The Lebanese-American singer, who is 35 years old, will soon be again, starting on February 9th, one of the coaches of the show "The Voice", on TF1, and he's about to release a fifth album. I would not be here if ... If I had not be en sleepwalking. At night, from when I turned seven to the beginning of adolescence, I moved furniture in the apartment. I even went out on the street without my parents realizing it. Once, the garbage men brough t me back in pajamas and socks. My mother ended up blocking the door of my room. This somnambulism was magic in my daily life. Do not control everything, let the unconscious lead me without thinking about the consequences, that's how I became the person and the artist that I am. Being unconscious is essential to my survival. Before you were Mika, you were born as Michael Holbrook Penniman, in 1983, in Lebanon, in a maronite christian family who was forced to flee a year later to run away from war. Daily life in Beirut had become very difficult and dangerous. One night, half the apartment was destroyed by a bombing raid. My mother is Lebanese-Syrian but my father is American, born in Jerusalem, raised in Cairo, in Washington, in London...They were able to go to Cyprus, then they chose Paris. There was a link with Lebanon. My mother had learned French. What memory do you keep of your Parisian years? Celui d’une enfance très joyeuse. The memory of a very joyful childhood. We lived in the 16th arrondissement, square Lamartine, my father had a very job in finance, I was going to a little private school called le cours Victor-Hugo. At home it was Paris-Beirut. The food was nourriture était Franco-Arab. Many people were waiting for the end of the war at our place. Time was a bit suspended. My mother made children clothes.Her workshop was in the dining room and in the living room. As she had many orders in the big stores, you could hear the noise of the sewing machine even during the night. We were allowed to go with her in le Sentier to choose material for our clothes that she made herself. My shorts, my shirts, my bow ties were a way to express myself, to have fun. At Christmas, we had to make ourselves the presents, and we were forbidden to buy them – anyway, we had no pocket money. Creating normal, it was life. And music was part of this. So how did your taste for music develop? I took piano lessons with twins sisters, who were a bit old, who were constantly eating cakes. One would sit on my right side and the other on my left side, one took care of my left hand and the other my right hand. Everything was going well. I was reading music, I was starting to play...and above all there was music all day long, in this apartment where life was very intense. My mother, the seamstresses, everyone sang along with Nina Simone, Bob Dylan, Joan Baez, Georges Moustaki, Jean Ferrat, Gainsbourg, The Rolling Stones, Fairouz, Oum Kalthoum… music became something obvious for me. I had cases filled with cassettes that I recorded, I made my "playlists" sorted out by par emotion and by color – because I "felt" music red or green. When things went wrong, the sound of the music was turned up in my house. What happened? My father was sent on a business trip to Kuweït by his bank. He got caught in the invasion of Koweït by Saddam Hussein, during the first gulf war, and he was held hostage in the American embassy during eight months. We had no way to be in touch, just a fax once in a while. The stability we had known so far with my sisters collapsed.When my father came back with a beard and Quand mon père est revenu, barbu, thinner, his eyes were different. We didn't call him "dad" any more but " Mike", I don't know why. After the trauma he had lived, it became difficult, he was fired. We lost everything. I learned how to deal with the bailiffs: when they ring, say that there are no adults in the house, that you can't open because you don't know them. But on their fourth visit, I saw them take everything, I was seated on the red couch. I will never forgive a system that allows that. This invasion in what is sacred, home. This is unjustified punishment... How did your parents react? My father was more and more silent. My mother, extremely determined. One night we crammed together in the Toyota Previa and we left for London. We ended up in bed & breakfast. It was supposed to last two weeks, we stayed for two years. When my father didn't earn enough money, my mother worked in a kitchen. When you were 8, you started going to elementary school in the Lycée français in London. And you became a victim of bullying as you explained at the end of 2018, during the national day against this plague... I had problems because suddenly I became dyslexic. I forgot theory, and even how to read and write. It was gone! I spoke English with a Parisian accent. I was dressed with my pink shorts, my overalls with yellow polka dots, my bow tie in the same material. In Paris, people took pics of me when I was going to fashion shows with my mother. There I was an extra terrestrial! A teacher who always wore a purple coat and a little black hat picked me, along with two other pupils, as a victim of her anger. She made me climb up on a chair and she humiliated me, saying in front of everyone that I was stupid, lazy, that all I wanted to to was playing – fortunately, I haven't changed! She wrote atrocious poems about us that the other pupils had to recite. I stopped talking, I wanted to become invisible, I didn't want to be there any more. At my house, it was the same, I barely talked any more, I didn't listen to music any more. My parents didn't understand. Until one day, when she was bringing my schoolbag in my class, my sister Paloma heard my teacher talk to me. My father came, he repeated to the teacher the words she had said and she fainted. I was expelled from school by the headmaster. I walked back home jumping and singing "The witch is dead!" I had in my head the image of the bad witch of Oz who melts because of the water. What did you do to keep busy while you were out of school? I used to go to the park with three ladies, a Spanish one, a Lebanese one and a Moroccan one who spent time in my house drinking tea and singing. Then, my mother hired a piano teacher who had just arrived from Russia. He didn't speak much and he smelt that sweat that comes from several hours of playing the piano. When he realized I couldn't read music, his expression changed. The following week he sent his wife to take over him. An opera singer who seemed out of the 20s, with her long embroidered collar. She was supposed to give me piano lessons but actually she didn't play the piano. She began singing melodies, I sang with her. The melodies became complicated, they turned into melodies by Schubert, by Brahms, by Britten. Three months later, I had my first job. At the age of 9, I was a chorister at the Royal Opera, in Die Frau ohne Schatten, by Richard Strauss. The theater! Covent Garden ! This giant magical box, red and golden where people sing, where people don't work in a bank, where people don't go to school, they get on the stage and life goes by fast.I decided that was what I wanted to do. But you had to go back to school, after a few months? Yes because the children who were in a little school nearby my house saw me everyday play with my two rabbits and heard me sing. They complained to the headmaster. It was unacceptable that all I did was playing! The headmaster asked me to spell words and he realized I had lots of problems. I went back to school, but my mother made a deal, and I had a huge tolerance so as to go on with music. As a young man you were admitted to the Royal College of Music. How did you finally go from lyrical to pop music? Royal College was a dream. Its cacophony reminded me of my mother's living room, in Paris. But I understood that I wasn't as strong as the other lyrical singers. So I had to write my own songs. With the money I made as a waiter, and with other students' help, I made pop songs demos. The voice on Happy Ending, for example, is Ida Falk Winland’s , who became a great opera singer. I wrote and wrote and wrote. I started recording songs when I was 11 years old. I traded musics I made for commercials for hours in a recording studio. After, I used to go to Sony's , EMI's , Warner's offices with my “ghetto-blaster” [cassette and radio player in the 70s-80s famous for its huge size]. I would play my songs to the secretary, who had no idea what to do with them and would sent me to another secretary, and I climbed up the building that way. There was always a time when I would get a refusal from the label, with a logo by my name. I was proud, I existed! After all these rejections, how could your career start? Since no one wanted to sign me, I went back to the main workshop: my house. My mother made clothes for me, I changed the " C" of Mica into " K" so it would be stronger, we drew a CD sleeve and a logo with my sister Yasmine, we took photos with my mother's Olympus , I interviewed myself, we put all that in a big black cardboard box, with a red ribbon around it, as if it were a CD collector. I took it to the majors. It didn't work right away. But the boss of Universal in England ended up giving me an appointment in a hotel. He asked me to sit at the piano and to sing. My first single, Grace Kelly, is a raging song against all these people in the music industry who didn't want me. Your first album "Life in Cartoon Motion" which was released in 2007 sold 7 millions copies all over the world, among which more than 1 million in France. And you find yourself in Parc des Princes in front of 50 000 people in July 2018. How do you react to this rapid success? I sing, I don't care about the rest. I still go on doing my singer job that I started at a young age with the same team, family and friends. I am less afraid in Parc des Princes than in opera: there it is my own music, it's a party! Your latest album, "No Place in Heaven" (platinum album in France) was released in 2015. Will your fifth album be released this year? Yes. It took me a year more than the others to create it. I write my lyrics, my melodies, I coproduce, make the artwork with my sister, all is handmade Music industry has changed a lot over this past decade, with the urban trends. More than ever, what I must do is follow my creativity, work with the melody, tell stories my way, with images, with characters, with colors. Stories sometimes like fairy tales, sometimes extremely dark, dirty, painful... Creating a world in which you can lose yourself during an hour and a half. You have been of the judges in the show "The Voice" since 2014. What attracts you about TV? I like that way of talking about music, as if you were in a pub talking with friends about what you're listening to. I also find interesting to develop someone's potential over a short and intense period of time. If that type of show had existed when I was trying to break through it might have been an option. But I'm not sure I would have made it. Each time I auditioned I was among the first ones to be rejected. I am rather bad at singing other people's songs. Your Syrian grandfather on your mother's side moved to the United States in 1918, your parents moved from Lebanon with you. What do you think about what's happening to the Syrian refugees who are trying to get to Europe? It is the most important human story of our time. Seeing that human beings are reduced to statistics bothers me a lot. I don't know anyone who would not give their hand to grab if someone was drowning in front of them. Yet that is what politicians are doing with their words.
  30. 10 points
    I had the opportunity to paticipate at the Vanity Fair Stories and to be present at the Mika's talk. 😊 I loved the two texts he read and how he read them. ❤ It's always a pleasure hear what he has to tell and I'm very happy to be there. 😍 My pics:
  31. 9 points
    Apologies for the late report! Lots of travel (and a work day) between Mika night and now. But it was another wonderful night with Mika in Los Angeles. Let's go through it! Venue was incredible: my friend compared it to Sagrada Familia Cathedral in Barcelona, which doesn't miss the mark too much! It's got intricate moulding on every surface, and the ceilings in the music hall are vaulted. Over-the-top in a very "Mika" way. Indy and I snuck to the front row for Kiesza (since it was a seated gig, there were some empty seats up front). This was her best night yet! She was very comfortable on stage, and seemed thrilled to have familiar faces up front. We knew all the words to her songs by now. At a seated show, the stage is much lower since they expect the audience to be seated. We all were seated for Kiesza's acoustic set. I don't know why we were so worried that everyone would be sitting for Mika … because after the band came on, then Mika skipped out onto stage, everyone leapt to their feet immediately. Of course! Ice Cream sounded great, but during Dear Jealousy was when I noticed the cold. Mika's nose was a bit stuffed up, and you could hear it when he sang or said "m" or "n." Poor Mika! In Relax, some fans from the rows further back rushed up to be close to the stage. This was a bit annoying, especially for folks up front whose view was blocked -- but I think Mika got a kick out of the visceral reaction that some fans had to the songs. During Big Girl, he put on his jacket again (some songs deserve jackets!). He gave an intro about how we're all going to a place…a place that is now closed … but if we all close our eyes, we'll be transported there. And then he ran right off the stage and skipped into the audience! Big Girl is such a party and everyone was dancing. At one point, Mika climbed up on the seats right in front of us, and put his hand on the man in the row ahead to balance as he sang! I didn't get any photos of this but it was a magical moment. He was RIGHT THERE! Lollipop was a total treat. He gave the same monologue about how his mom should have warned him about the BOY next door. The two men in the row in front of us turned to each other and high fived!! Another "pro" of the seated show--it's a lot easier to experience what other fans are feeling, especially those at their first show! Mika's openness is clearly resonating with his audience, and I'm glad he feels comfortable to share that with us. Highlight of the show was hands down acapella Happy Ending. We couldn't believe that he sang with no mic, in this huge theatre, with a cold-- and sounded amazing. Unlike SF no one was screaming; the hall was completely quiet. This moment is what everyone was talking about when I was standing in the lobby after the show. He must know how impressive his voice is, and how much of a gift it is to hear it unfiltered. It seemed like everyone who walked out of the show was gushing about this moment. He did Blue, too. I think this was the first point in the night when he acknowledged the cold. He said something along the lines of "this song is very tricky to sing, doubly so when you are sick, so please go easy on me." And we did. Again, the theater was absolutely quiet. So quiet that Mika actually had to signal his pianist to turn the volume down. And his voice did crack a couple times. But wow, the best way to experience this song is sitting with thousands of others in rapt attention. It's just beautiful--and something I will miss most about this tour. About halfway through the night his hair was crazy, all flat on the top and sticking out to the sides. When he came back for the encore he had combed it down. Beautiful! Despite being sick, Mika never ran out of steam. At the very end of the night, when everyone was partying to "Stay High," I couldn't believe how powerful his voice still sounded! Still hitting all the high notes. So thankful. As we walked out, I spotted Perez Hilton waiting for Mika after the show! They must have had a backstage meetup. We milled about in the lobby for a while, then tracked everyone down at the back stage door, which was all the way through a parking lot and around the back of the venue. There weren't too many people waiting, maybe about 30-40. We did stand around and chat for a while (nice to have a chance to say goodbye to all the friends we've made on this tour!). A couple big trucks pulled up to load out the equipment. Then a staff member at the venue came outside and said "Mika's not going to come out! No way! Go home!" We all kind of laughed at this because we knew it wasn't true. Then just like that, the big black SUV pulled up, and the manager popped out. He formed us into a straight line. And Mika appeared Indy and I had nothing for him to sign, and he seemed a little confused when we just thanked him over and over again. Very star-struck! I will kick myself about this until the next tour -- think of something more meaningful to say! -- and I know this because I had a dream about seeing Mika and being tongue-tied again last night! Haha! But I am glad we got to express how much we appreciated this whole tour and all the time he's spent with the fans along the way. P.M.D. is real. We slept about three hours between the gig and our flights, and I have pretty much had Mika's music (new and old!) on loop since then. It's been such a long time, and these shows have felt like a way for me to reconnect with so much of this music that I'd lost track of in the intervening years. So many beautiful songs, and so many friends to discuss them with. Thank you to everyone (merci beaucoup!) we met along the way. And to Mika most of all. Hope to see you all before too long!
  32. 9 points
    It's been a veryyyyyyyyyyyyy long time since Mika rocked my world, but he sure did!!! It had been over 4 years since I last saw him perform. At first I wasn't sure if I would still feel the same way, but after the first song, it felt just right! Since I didn't want to queue, I decided to join my friends on the balcony. The view was absolutely perfect and I didn't regret it. When Mika first came on, we got up to dance and someone behind us wasn't happy about that. The guard came over and told us to sit. Within a few minutes, Mika told everyone to "Get the f**k up" ... so we did! We were only following Mika's orders .... 🤣 A few pictures i took and also a video of Lollipop This concert has definitely put me back in a Mika mood. I guess the love was never gone, but it was dormant. For those of you who know me, I don't really enjoy the tv shows he's been doing. But since he's returned to the music, all i can say is.... I"M BACK BABY!!!! Looking forward to the album! I can't wait! Guylaine xx lollipop.mp4
  33. 9 points
    The Bowery Presents https://thebowerypresents.tumblr.com/post/187686239987/mikaphotos Professional photos
  34. 9 points
    5 clips into one, re-uploaded to YouTube
  35. 9 points
    This one from a page of "SNOOZER" Japanese magazine in 2009.
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  39. 9 points
    Facebook Cantinetta del Nonno Non è un pesce d'aprile..!!! Questa sera a cena in Cantinetta abbiamo avuto il piacere di avere Mika😉
  40. 9 points
    I love his interview and how he blushes from 3'41 until 4'37 talking about LYWID and his partner.
  41. 9 points
    so curious what is going to be the main concept for the album
  42. 9 points
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    4 years today of this crazy trip to Milan signing sessions for swatch *sigh*
  44. 9 points
  45. 9 points
    Nikos IG story Bon anniversaire Jenifer Jenifer ( (born 15 November 1982 in Nice, France)
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  48. 9 points
    Eriko, look, I found a lot of beautiful birds for your collection of birds pictures . But be careful, it's a rare species, and protected by many fans. 😍
  49. 8 points
    https://www.sciencesetavenir.fr/animaux/les-fans-de-chats-seraient-plus-intelligents-que-les-autres_100371 https://www.apa-hai.org/human-animal-interaction/haib/2017/personality-differences-dog-people-cat-people/ According to a recent American scientific study, people who love cats are more intelligent than those who love dogs!
  50. 8 points
    Pic of the day. Happy Friday!! Looking forward the weekend!!