Recommended Posts

In this case amount is monetary value and quantity is number of items. So the form will list items such as 5 (quantity) boxes of paper x $ 3.00 (amount) = $15.00 (amount).

 

There are times when you can use them interchangably to mean "number of _____" though. In fact I will normally use "amount" in conversation rather than "quantity". eg You and I have the same amount of jelly beans.

 

:doh: Yes, I didn't fully understand, sorry.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In the last example (which sounds familiar to me! :wink2: )

 

You have no idea about how much some random chats are improving my english.

I actually still need to go back on some of them, and take care of some new words.

 

Thanks girls for your explanations. This is very useful.

 

And I want everybody to know that yesterday I watched a show about weird diseases, switching to original language (aka AE), and I did understand most of it. :groovy:

I'm feeling awesome ever since.

Mostly because I'm now aware that the blood of some strange kind of prehistoric crabs coagulates in a few secs when it touches unsterilized items :shocked:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
You have no idea about how much some random chats are improving my english.

I actually still need to go back on some of them, and take care of some new words.

 

Thanks girls for your explanations. This is very useful.

 

And I want everybody to know that yesterday I watched a show about weird diseases, switching to original language (aka AE), and I did understand most of it. :groovy:

I'm feeling awesome ever since.

Mostly because I'm now aware that the blood of some strange kind of prehistoric crabs coagulates in a few secs when it touches unsterilized items :shocked:

 

You mean horseshoe crabs (which aren't actually crabs at all).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
You mean horseshoe crabs (which aren't actually crabs at all).

 

 

:yes:

 

images?q=tbn:ANd9GcSGIJfbGhxd-P9OS_T1lpp0cxGKD9omtS_VjA08OXEgppDG5jxgrQ

 

Let's go Nat Geo :biggrin2:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello, it's me again :)

 

I don't understand the difference between 'historic' and 'historical' :doh:

 

I see no difference in use of these words here:

 

July 4th, 1776 was a historic day for America.

 

A large number of historical events have taken place in the Tower of London over the centuries.

 

We translate them into Russian with the same word :aah:

 

Please, help! Thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hello, it's me again :)

 

I don't understand the difference between 'historic' and 'historical' :doh:

 

I see no difference in use of these words here:

 

July 4th, 1776 was a historic day for America.

 

A large number of historical events have taken place in the Tower of London over the centuries.

 

We translate them into Russian with the same word :aah:

 

Please, help! Thanks!

 

Historic means it was a very important moment in history. July 4, 1776 was a historic day because America declared independence from England.

 

Historical is just an adjective to describe something pertaining to events in the past. So you could talk about a historical novel which would be a work of fiction about a certain period of history.

 

The Tower of London was actually the place for some historic moments in history such as the beheading of Anne Boleyn. But I think they are using "historical" here to just speak about the general history of the Tower. Events that occurred at the Tower are in the past because now the Tower just plays more of a ceremonial role and functions as a museum instead of a royal residence and prison.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Historic means it was a very important moment in history. July 4, 1776 was a historic day because America declared independence from England.

 

Historical is just an adjective to describe something pertaining to events in the past. So you could talk about a historical novel which would be a work of fiction about a certain period of history.

 

The Tower of London was actually the place for some historic moments in history such as the beheading of Anne Boleyn. But I think they are using "historical" here to just speak about the general history of the Tower. Events that occurred at the Tower are in the past because now the Tower just plays more of a ceremonial role and functions as a museum instead of a royal residence and prison.

 

I got it at last! Thank you very much, Christine :huglove:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just bumping this thread as it seems that people are getting a little confused by some English expressions :blink:

 

So if there is something you don't quite understand, ask here

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am also quite well spoken and would not mind defining some English expressions to non-native speakers. I am attempting to learn French at the moment and I understand the struggle :naughty:

English is very strange as we have multiple words with the same definition or very similar definitions which can be confusing but  I happy to help. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'll volunteer here as well, I'm happy to help with English grammar and expressions/idioms. English grammar is occasionally confusing even to a native speaker, I cannot imagine what learning it as a second language must be like.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, Kumazzz said:

:bye:

 

Could anyone  explain me please ?

 

"And I know that I could eat the stage on Broadway... I think it's about the right show. "

from

His Name is Michael Holbrook, but You Know Him as MIKA

 

thank you.

 

 

 

According to the Urban Dictionary

 

image.png.30919c5dc7f218441323901dfd9c661d.png

 

So generally Mika sais that he would do the Brodway if it is a right show.

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, Kumazzz said:

:bye:

 

Could anyone  explain me please ?

 

"And I know that I could eat the stage on Broadway... I think it's about the right show. "

from

His Name is Michael Holbrook, but You Know Him as MIKA

 

thank you.

 

 

I think he means "chew the scenery" which we use to mean overact really dramatically. 

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"Eat the stage" is a strange expression - I assume it is an Americanism :dunno:  as I've never heard it in the UK.

 

I don't think it means overacting - it sounds to me more like "eat the dirt", which would mean falling over - so is he saying he could fail on Broadway unless he had the right show?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We use this expression in Italian, don't know if there's a similar one in French. It means having a lot of success when on stage, doing a performance very well. For example, if a concert has a big response from the public, we say that the artist "ate the stage", provoked a huge/positive reaction. So in this case, he would have a big success, if he found the right show to perform in. Could it be what he meant?

Edited by sara09
  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
39 minutes ago, sara09 said:

We use this expression in Italian, don't know if there's a similar one in French. It means having a lot of success when on stage, doing a performance very well. For example, if a concert has a big response from the public, we say that the artist "ate the stage", provoked a huge/positive reaction. So in this case, he would have a big success, if he found the right show to perform in. Could it be what he meant?

 

That's exactly how I get it! :thumb_yello:

 

(Even though I speak neither Italian nor French and I'm not even a native speaker of English so my opinion is probably irrelevant... :biggrin2:)

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, sara09 said:

We use this expression in Italian, don't know if there's a similar one in French. It means having a lot of success when on stage, doing a performance very well. For example, if a concert has a big response from the public, we say that the artist "ate the stage", provoked a huge/positive reaction. So in this case, he would have a big success, if he found the right show to perform in. Could it be what he meant?

 

I think we'd probably say "owned the stage" in English.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 9/8/2019 at 12:26 AM, sara09 said:

We use this expression in Italian, don't know if there's a similar one in French. It means having a lot of success when on stage, doing a performance very well. For example, if a concert has a big response from the public, we say that the artist "ate the stage", provoked a huge/positive reaction. So in this case, he would have a big success, if he found the right show to perform in. Could it be what he meant?

 

That's the way I understood it as well. I think it's not unusual if you speak several languages to mix up some expressions - or maybe it is an expression in American English, which would equal "own the stage" in British English. Languages mix up that way over time - for example also in German we have some expressions in everyday language, which is in fact a German version of something you'd only say in English - so it's not an "official" expression, but people use it, and people understand it - for example "that makes sense" ("Das macht Sinn"), meanwhile it's an official expression, but it only came over the last few years, it's an expression that came from the English one. Or "not really" ("nicht wirklich"), same for that.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.