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I have been thinking of taking conversational German just because the Goethe Institut is in my office building. I prefer French but it's far away and I am lazy :teehee:

 

It's hard to compare learning a language in my teens for exams etc with learning for pleasure as an Oldling, but German seems to me to be very much easier. Maybe at the simple level it's not too bad and it may get worse. But I'm coping with genders and putting verbs at the end of sentences. In French it's the accent as well as the grammar and vocabulary.

 

I bought an audio (audible) book called Earworms which I highly recommend. I've had it in my car for weeks and play it all the time, the German goes in like the words of songs.

 

Anyway, we warned our prof that we'd have forgotten everything by October and she said she was used to it!

 

De toute façon,- ou quand même (?) ou d'ailleurs (?) - nous avons averti notre prof que nous avions tout oublié par Octobre et elle a dit qu'elle le savait bien !

Edited by Ruth
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Thanks Ruth, I'll have a look out for Earworms. I've got some good conversational French "tapes" on my iPad, but can't remember the name offhand. I started learning French when I was 11 so I don't have too many problems with accents and pronunciations. It's all grammar and trying to construct sentences because I didn't study it long enough academically. :aah:

 

German is completely foreign to me. I only coped on my short trips to Germany because I was married to a German. :naughty:

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When I was at school the French we studied was too academic & grammatical, too based on reading and especially writing correctly, so the important bit - the accent - didn't feature enough. I wasn't told, to the best of my recollection, about stressing the last (sounded) syllable. I heard that on a Michel Thomas CD and it's been very helpful.

 

There is an EarWorms for French too which we bought but I haven't listened to; it's probably a bit basic for me in as much as I am rubbish at French but I have studied it for many years.

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"Le" is used for words that are masculine and "la" for those that are feminine. I think this site explains it pretty well.

 

http://www.french-linguistics.co.uk/grammar/le_or_la_in_french.shtml

 

There's also l' . It's used to avoid le (or la)+ word beginning with a vowel or a h that is silent. For instance: l'école (we can't say la école, and have to use l' instead but we can say une école ), l'herbe/une herbe, l'animal/ un animal.

 

There is no particular rule to know if a word is masculine or femine. I remember fleur is a French feminine word but is masculine for the Italians (il fiore) :wink2:

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"Le" is used for words that are masculine and "la" for those that are feminine. I think this site explains it pretty well.

 

http://www.french-linguistics.co.uk/grammar/le_or_la_in_french.shtml

 

There's also l' . It's used to avoid le (or la)+ word beginning with a vowel or a h that is silent. For instance: l'école (we can't say la école, and have to use l' instead but we can say une école ), l'herbe/une herbe, l'animal/ un animal.

 

There is no particular rule to know if a word is masculine or femine. I remember fleur is a French feminine word but is masculine for the Italians (il fiore) :wink2:

 

It's always seemed bizarre to me, the allocation of gender to nouns. French speakers just 'get it' like breathing, but it's tricky to learn. I wish I'd always had to connect the correct le/la to any noun I used as it might have stuck better. I was wondering if masculine for French nouns would be masculine in German but if it isn't the same in Italian as French then there's no chance. And that's before popping neuter into the mix!

 

The simple 'a' and 'the' are, apparently, one of the reasons for the ascendancy of the English language.

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  • 3 months later...

I can't believe I never noticed this thread before...

 

CAN I BE ONE OF THE STUDENTS? :blush-anim-cl:

 

Like seriously, learning French is probably one of the things I wanna accomplish in my life. I'm in love with the language and the country itself. Will be stalking this :teehee:

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I can't believe I never noticed this thread before...

 

CAN I BE ONE OF THE STUDENTS? :blush-anim-cl:

 

Like seriously, learning French is probably one of the things I wanna accomplish in my life. I'm in love with the language and the country itself. Will be stalking this :teehee:

 

Tu peux dire et écrire en français et quelqu'un gentil va t'aider :wink2:

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  • 6 months later...

Ah! A deserted thread.

 

Still, someone might see it. . . .

I'm looking for a link to a photo of something. In France, a wedding photographer often tows a contraption behind his car, which opens and lifts up to make 5 levels for the guests to stand on for photos. I can't seem to find a picture because my French isn't good enough for google.fr

 

Can anyone help please?

 

Or, as I said in the French speaking thread . . .

 

Bonjour, je cherche un photo de quelque chose. Aidez-moi s'il vous plait.

 

Il y a un contraption, un bidule, apporté par le photographe. Ceci est remorqué derrière sa voiture et élargit vers le haut pour offrir jusqu'à cinq niveaux sur lesquels toute la noce se tiennent dans un groupe.

 

Le savez-vous?

 

Pourriez-vous me trouver un lien Web vers une image svp?

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  • 2 weeks later...

Hello! I'm just starting to learn French and have a question about your interrogative particles for "what?", "que?" and "quoi?". When do you use which one? It seems totally random for me at the moment. For example there are those two sentences and I see not difference between them:

 

Qu´est-ce que c´est? C´est une affiche.

C´est quoi? C´est un tableau.

 

And are there any interrogative particles that you can't 'combine' with est-ce que?

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why am i here until today?knew nothing about this thread before!thank god that i found you.well im just a new learner and don't have much time online,mom doesn't let me learn French cuz my english is still not working well,anyway it's time and piss off my lovely mother,can you guys start with the basic vocabulay like numbers?(forgive me if im seem to be stupid)

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why am i here until today?knew nothing about this thread before!thank god that i found you.well im just a new learner and don't have much time online,mom doesn't let me learn French cuz my english is still not working well,anyway it's time and piss off my lovely mother,can you guys start with the basic vocabulay like numbers?(forgive me if im seem to be stupid)

 

Well I'm not that good at french, but I know the numbers :wink2:

 

1 - un

2- deux

3 - trois

4- quatre

5 - cinq

6 - six

7 - sept

8 - huit

9 - neuf

10 - dix

 

http://french.about.com/od/vocabulary/ss/numbers.htm

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Well I'm not that good at french, but I know the numbers :wink2:

 

1 - un

2- deux

3 - trois

4- quatre

5 - cinq

6 - six

7 - sept

8 - huit

9 - neuf

10 - dix

 

http://french.about.com/od/vocabulary/ss/numbers.htm

 

11 - onze

12 - douze

13 - treize

14 - quatorze

15 - quinze

16 - seize

17 - dix-sept (like 10 +7)

18 - dix-huit

19 - dix-neuf

20 - vingt

21 - vingt et un (like 20 and 1)

30 - trente

40 - quarante

50 - cinquante

60 - soixante

70 - soixante-dix (like 60 + 10)

71 - soixante-onze (60 + 11)

80 - quatre-vingt (4 x 20)

90 - quatre-vingt dix

91 - quatre-vingt onze (90 + 11)

100 - cent

1000 - mille

1000000 - milllion

1000000000 - milliard (not really sure. :D)

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11 - onze

12 - douze

13 - treize

14 - quatorze

15 - quinze

16 - seize

17 - dix-sept (like 10 +7)

18 - dix-huit

19 - dix-neuf

20 - vingt

21 - vingt et un (like 20 and 1)

30 - trente

40 - quarante

50 - cinquante

60 - soixante

70 - soixante-dix (like 60 + 10)

71 - soixante-onze (60 + 11)

80 - quatre-vingts (4 x 20) but quatre-vingt-un, quatre-vingt-deux, etc

90 - quatre-vingt dix

91 - quatre-vingt onze (90 + 11)

100 - cent

1000 - mille 2000- deux mille (no 's' at the end of mille)

1000000 - milllion

1000000000 - milliard (not really sure. :D)

That's it! :wink2:

 

Now about qu'est-ce que c'est? and c'est quoi:

 

They are both interrogative sentences. "qu'est-ce que c'est?" is less informal and familiar than "c'est quoi?". It means "what is it?". You can't answer "yes" or "no".

On the other hand, "est-ce que (tu aimes les chansons de Mika)?"can be answered by "yes" or "no" or "a litle".

 

"est-ce que...?" is a correct, less formal question than "aimes-tu (les chansons de Mika)?" but these questions have the same meaning.

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So it depends only on how formal the question is.

 

But I want to ask about est-ce que in combination with interrogation particles again. I've seen it with "qu'est-ce que" (= que est-ce que) or "ou est-ce que" some times. But can I do that with all interrogation particles? Is it possible to say 'Pourquoi est-ce que tu gâche ta vie?' for example?

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So it depends only on how formal the question is.

 

But I want to ask about est-ce que in combination with interrogation particles again. I've seen it with "qu'est-ce que" (= que est-ce que) or "ou est-ce que" some times. But can I do that with all interrogation particles? Is it possible to say 'Pourquoi est-ce que tu gâche ta vie?' for example?

 

The most grammatical correct way to say it would be "Pourquoi gâches-tu ta vie?" but your example is just find and plenty of people use it:thumb_yello:

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I am finding the biggest problem with learning a second language is just learning to think in a different language rather than remembering vocabulary or specific rules. It would be so much easier to learn to think in French by using English words but French grammar. I think it would sink in a lot faster and people wouldn't make the mistakes that they do.

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