Recommended Posts

why am i here until today?knew nothing about this thread before!thank god that i found you.well im just a new learner and don't have much time online,mom doesn't let me learn French cuz my english is still not working well,anyway it's time and piss off my lovely mother,can you guys start with the basic vocabulay like numbers?(forgive me if im seem to be stupid)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

can I be added too? I am learning advanced French right now, so I can be both a student and a teacher? haha. :))

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think you use 'est-ce que' to a question that answers to yes or no.

as in, est-ce que vous avez..? (is it that you have..?) :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
why am i here until today?knew nothing about this thread before!thank god that i found you.well im just a new learner and don't have much time online,mom doesn't let me learn French cuz my english is still not working well,anyway it's time and piss off my lovely mother,can you guys start with the basic vocabulay like numbers?(forgive me if im seem to be stupid)

 

Well I'm not that good at french, but I know the numbers :wink2:

 

1 - un

2- deux

3 - trois

4- quatre

5 - cinq

6 - six

7 - sept

8 - huit

9 - neuf

10 - dix

 

http://french.about.com/od/vocabulary/ss/numbers.htm

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Well I'm not that good at french, but I know the numbers :wink2:

 

1 - un

2- deux

3 - trois

4- quatre

5 - cinq

6 - six

7 - sept

8 - huit

9 - neuf

10 - dix

 

http://french.about.com/od/vocabulary/ss/numbers.htm

 

11 - onze

12 - douze

13 - treize

14 - quatorze

15 - quinze

16 - seize

17 - dix-sept (like 10 +7)

18 - dix-huit

19 - dix-neuf

20 - vingt

21 - vingt et un (like 20 and 1)

30 - trente

40 - quarante

50 - cinquante

60 - soixante

70 - soixante-dix (like 60 + 10)

71 - soixante-onze (60 + 11)

80 - quatre-vingt (4 x 20)

90 - quatre-vingt dix

91 - quatre-vingt onze (90 + 11)

100 - cent

1000 - mille

1000000 - milllion

1000000000 - milliard (not really sure. :D)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 - onze

12 - douze

13 - treize

14 - quatorze

15 - quinze

16 - seize

17 - dix-sept (like 10 +7)

18 - dix-huit

19 - dix-neuf

20 - vingt

21 - vingt et un (like 20 and 1)

30 - trente

40 - quarante

50 - cinquante

60 - soixante

70 - soixante-dix (like 60 + 10)

71 - soixante-onze (60 + 11)

80 - quatre-vingts (4 x 20) but quatre-vingt-un, quatre-vingt-deux, etc

90 - quatre-vingt dix

91 - quatre-vingt onze (90 + 11)

100 - cent

1000 - mille 2000- deux mille (no 's' at the end of mille)

1000000 - milllion

1000000000 - milliard (not really sure. :D)

That's it! :wink2:

 

Now about qu'est-ce que c'est? and c'est quoi:

 

They are both interrogative sentences. "qu'est-ce que c'est?" is less informal and familiar than "c'est quoi?". It means "what is it?". You can't answer "yes" or "no".

On the other hand, "est-ce que (tu aimes les chansons de Mika)?"can be answered by "yes" or "no" or "a litle".

 

"est-ce que...?" is a correct, less formal question than "aimes-tu (les chansons de Mika)?" but these questions have the same meaning.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So it depends only on how formal the question is.

 

But I want to ask about est-ce que in combination with interrogation particles again. I've seen it with "qu'est-ce que" (= que est-ce que) or "ou est-ce que" some times. But can I do that with all interrogation particles? Is it possible to say 'Pourquoi est-ce que tu gâche ta vie?' for example?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
So it depends only on how formal the question is.

 

But I want to ask about est-ce que in combination with interrogation particles again. I've seen it with "qu'est-ce que" (= que est-ce que) or "ou est-ce que" some times. But can I do that with all interrogation particles? Is it possible to say 'Pourquoi est-ce que tu gâche ta vie?' for example?

 

The most grammatical correct way to say it would be "Pourquoi gâches-tu ta vie?" but your example is just find and plenty of people use it:thumb_yello:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am finding the biggest problem with learning a second language is just learning to think in a different language rather than remembering vocabulary or specific rules. It would be so much easier to learn to think in French by using English words but French grammar. I think it would sink in a lot faster and people wouldn't make the mistakes that they do.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
So it depends only on how formal the question is.

 

But I want to ask about est-ce que in combination with interrogation particles again. I've seen it with "qu'est-ce que" (= onque est-ce que) or "ou est-ce que" some times. But can I do that with all interrogation particles? Is it possible to say 'Pourquoi est-ce que tu gâche ta vie?' for example?

 

 

We can use the different combinations:

 

où est-ce que tu vas? = où vas-tu?= tu vas où?

 

quand est-ce que tu pars?= quand pars-tu?= tu pars quand?

 

comment est-ce qu'on fait?= comment fait-on?= on fait comment?

 

D'où est-ce que ça vient?= d'où ça vient?= ça vient d'où?

 

They all mean the same but they depend on the context. The bolded questions are more informal, oral, everyday formulations :wink2:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 - onze

12 - douze

13 - treize

14 - quatorze

15 - quinze

16 - seize

17 - dix-sept (like 10 +7)

18 - dix-huit

19 - dix-neuf

20 - vingt

21 - vingt et un (like 20 and 1)

30 - trente

40 - quarante

50 - cinquante

60 - soixante

70 - soixante-dix (like 60 + 10)

71 - soixante-onze (60 + 11)

80 - quatre-vingt (4 x 20)

90 - quatre-vingt dix

91 - quatre-vingt onze (90 + 11)

100 - cent

1000 - mille

1000000 - milllion

1000000000 - milliard (not really sure. :D)

 

Well I'm not that good at french, but I know the numbers :wink2:

 

1 - un

2- deux

3 - trois

4- quatre

5 - cinq

6 - six

7 - sept

8 - huit

9 - neuf

10 - dix

 

http://french.about.com/od/vocabulary/ss/numbers.htm

 

thanks a lot for you guys:)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I am finding the biggest problem with learning a second language is just learning to think in a different language rather than remembering vocabulary or specific rules. It would be so much easier to learn to think in French by using English words but French grammar. I think it would sink in a lot faster and people wouldn't make the mistakes that they do.

 

the french grammar seems quite difficult for me,so maybe basic vocabulay still works quite well,when i first studied english i surely couldn't think that way cuz i completely had no idea about what i was talking about,i suppose only when the base is made can we be able to learn about grammar:wink2:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The best way to learn the vocabulary of a new language is.. to read ! You can't even imagine how much my english has improved in 6 months on the MFC. This is awesome. :shocked: It's sure that you need to look really often in a dictionnary (or google traduction :teehee: ) but it really worths it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

it's a pity that i can't stay here longer,i will start school next week and meanwhile i will have no chance to come here until the summer:(it improved mine as well,especially when i reviewed those old interviews my listening just rises in a high speed,time is the only problem now,any good advice to learn french in short time?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
it's a pity that i can't stay here longer,i will start school next week and meanwhile i will have no chance to come here until the summer:(it improved mine as well,especially when i reviewed those old interviews my listening just rises in a high speed,time is the only problem now,any good advice to learn french in short time?

 

read books, watch french TV or find a tutorial online or maybe you can buy one:thumb_yello:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've just tried to understand the Caprice interview myself to practice my French. It's really astonishing how much I did understand :D

 

However there are two small parts where I have problems with understanding and I hope you can help me:

 

On vous a déjà vu souvent en Suisse.

 

I don't understand why the "on" is here. For now I just know that it's used for "we" or the general "you". But that doesn't make sense in this sentence for me. Without the "on" the sentence would make much more sense for me: "Vous a déjà vu souvent en Suisse" - "You have already been in Switzerland a lot of times".

 

Mais mon entourage m’a dit que cela ne m’allait pas pas.

 

What does "ne m'allait pas pas" mean? Is it a phrase?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I've just tried to understand the Caprice interview myself to practice my French. It's really astonishing how much I did understand :D

 

However there are two small parts where I have problems with understanding and I hope you can help me:

 

On vous a déjà vu souvent en Suisse.

 

I don't understand why the "on" is here. For now I just know that it's used for "we" or the general "you". But that doesn't make sense in this sentence for me. Without the "on" the sentence would make much more sense for me: "Vous a déjà vu souvent en Suisse" - "You have already been in Switzerland a lot of times".

 

Mais mon entourage m’a dit que cela ne m’allait pas pas.

 

What does "ne m'allait pas pas" mean? Is it a phrase?

 

'On vous a déjà vu souvent' is a perfectly correct phrase, which means 'You have already often been seen'. Where English uses passive we tend to use active in French so the literal translation would be 'we have already often seen you'

 

'Cela ne m'allait pas' : there's apparently a double 'pas' in the sentence they wrote so that's a mistake. Otherwise it's a correct phrase meaning 'it doesn't suit me'

 

Hope that helped :wink2:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, it did! :huglove:

 

After reading your translation of 'On vous a déjà vu souvent' I realized that I had a big fallacy. I somehow thought the "a" belongs to "vous", but that's nonsense, it belongs to "on" as it's "a" and not "avez". And the "vous" is not the "Who?-vous" but the "Whom?-vous" and it is in front of "a" and not in front of "vu" because of the exception rule "have always steals the pronoun".

 

PCGlhbirne.gif

 

Thanks, now it's total clear :D

 

And I'm happy that the double "pas" is just a mistake, it confused me very much :aah: Thanks for translation as well :original:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I need help.

How do I say: this book is about le petit prince in french?

 

We could say "Ce livre parle du Petit Prince" or "Ce livre raconte l'histoire du Petit Prince" :wink2:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
We could say "Ce livre parle du Petit Prince" or "Ce livre raconte l'histoire du Petit Prince" :wink2:

 

Damn didn't write it like that :huh:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was about to open a thread like this :thumb_yello:

 

Since i might be going to Montreal I did my first French lesson today, it was on how to say things like "Do you speak english?" and "I don't understand french?". I've already forgotten most of what i learned though, especially regarding pronounciation. I want instant results :sneaky2:

If i don't get frustrated and totally give up i'll probably be using this thread a lot. FRENCH IS SO HARD!

Thanks to all the french speakers who're helping out :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I was about to open a thread like this :thumb_yello:

 

Since i might be going to Montreal I did my first French lesson today, it was on how to say things like "Do you speak english?" and "I don't understand french?". I've already forgotten most of what i learned though, especially regarding pronounciation. I want instant results :sneaky2:

If i don't get frustrated and totally give up i'll probably be using this thread a lot. FRENCH IS SO HARD!

Thanks to all the french speakers who're helping out :)

 

I am using this app. My French is not beginner's so you might struggle a bit but I tried the Dutch and managed even though I didn't know a word before. You'd just need to look up some of the grammar rules to try to make sense of some of the differences you see from one example to the next. Just the whole concept of masculine and feminine is totally bizarre for us. :aah:https://www.duolingo.com

 

Just so you know you will probably not have to deal with anyone who doesn't speak English or even tell them that you don't speak French. Everyone in the service industry seems to be bilingual and will usually greet you with "bonjour, hello" so if you respond in English they will speak English.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.