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[EDIT: The last thread about Mika in the US press was started in 2013. I think it's time to start a new one, since the album is coming out SOON! So I've moved these posts to a new thread here -- dcdeb]

 

MIKA in US Press - 2015

 

MAGAZINES

 

 

REVIEWS

 

VIDEOS

  • Access Hollywood  #32

 

 

 

========================================================

 

Fugues juin 2015

 

The triumphant return of Mika

 

SCANS

 

 

An interview with a Canadian columnist Richard Burnnet

 

on

 

Fugues juin 2015

http://issuu.com/fugues/docs/fuguesjuin2015

 

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http://www.fugues.com/242539-article-the-triumphant-return-of-mika.html

 

ARTICLE

 

 

 

The first time I met Mika some years ago, he turned to me, legs crossed and, pretending to hold a cigarette, did his finest imitation of Freddie Mercury.

 

“Yes, dahling,” Mika said à la Mercury. “Hello, dear!”

 

Mika looked fabulously fey.

 

“And he holds his beer like this,” Mika continued, imitating Mercury from the famous backstage British TV interview on the Queen – We Will Rock You: Live in Montreal 1981 DVD. “And he hardly drinks it!”

 

British pop star Mika shares more than just music with Mercury. “You must get a lot of comparisons with Freddie!” I said. 

 

“For being condescending?” Mika asks.

 

“No, for being fabulous!”

 

“Of all the comparisons with Freddie Mercury – which I don’t think are fair because he was far more talented than I am – there was one I got from Brian May who came to one of my concerts in London. It was me on stage with 17 musicians, all acoustic, an orchestra with two classical singers, and Brian went crazy! He said to me, ‘You play the piano just like Freddie. You lead the band just like Freddie did.’ Brian made me so happy, so proud.”

MIKA-pr-photo-2015.jpg

 

Like Mercury, who was born in the onetime British protectorate of Zanzibar and raised in India, Mika was born in Beirut, in the former French protectorate of Lebanon, before he too moved to London.

 

And, like Mercury, questions about Mika’s sexuality dogged the singer from the moment he shot to fame in 2007. “I’m not going to ask you any personal questions,” I told Mika, “but I will ask you this: You have always said your private life is private. But as a pop star, don’t you think your private life is public property?”

 

Mika stared at me. “Because I don’t offer it up for sale.”

 

When I saw Mika again this past February in Montreal, the singer had just sold out three nights at the Maison Symphonique, performing newly-orchestrated interpretations of his songs with the Montreal Symphony Orchestra. I actually gained admission with a hand-written OSM ticket and sat in an usher’s chair!

 

The next day I met up with Mika in his Old Montreal hotel. He was still flush from the excitement of opening night with the OSM. “I enjoy Montreal, it’s an easy place to be creative, it has all the good sides of North American culture as well as French and European culture, yet it is not in the shadow of the United States, which I think is great. It is a place that has fought to preserve its cultural identity and by doing so procures culture. The first response you get when you come up with a crazy idea in Montreal is not ‘No’ but ‘Maybe.’ And that’s pretty great. That’s why crazy things come out of this town.”

 

Mika was also excited about his new album No Place in Heaven (Virgin EMI / Universal Music Canada) which will be released on June 16, ahead of his July 4 concert at the Montreal International Jazz Festival. The album follows Mika’s 2013 hit single Popular Song which featured Ariana Grande and has hit 100 Million views on YouTube and Vevo. During his run with the OSM, Mika also sang a beautifully-orchestrated version of Last Party, an ode to Freddie Mercury on the new album.

 

 

So I remind Mika about the time he imitated Freddie’s famous backstage British TV interview on the Queen – We Will Rock You: Live in Montreal 1981 DVD the first time we met.

 

“That interview is something straight out of Absolutely Fabulous,” Mika laughs. “It’s funny that you mention Freddie because in the song Last Party, it started with this idea that I had, when Freddie Mercury found out that he had AIDS, he closed himself up in a nightclub and he had a crazy party for three days, with drugs and everything. It was the worst possible thing to do after discovering that kind of news, but that’s what he did. That’s why that song is called Last Party, and it’s one of the saddest songs I’ve ever heard.”

I then tell Mika a story openly-gay Judas Priest frontman Rob Halford told me some years ago, about what it was like to rise to showbiz fame in the 1970s at the height of the homophobic “disco sucks” movement, which segued into the AIDS hysteria of the 1980s. 

 

“I saw Freddie, it must have been in the early 1980s, and I was going to Mykonos with friends from London via Athens,” Halford recalled. “We got to the hotel [in Athens] and did what we all did then – the clubs, the parties. At one club Freddie was holding court at the other end of the bar. We were two ships passing in the night. He waved, I waved. The place was packed and we never got the chance to connect. The next day we all went to Mykonos and I was on a beach when his yacht sailed by.”

 

When Mika publicly came out in 2012 the showbiz closet was still difficult to negotiate.

 

“Things take time,” says Mika, now 31. “From the viewpoint of the press and the veil of marketing – external things – you can often forget that things take time. There is a personal side to every story. How do you deal with something publicly when you don’t deal with it personally? That should be the last thing you do, if you’re not dealing with it. Otherwise you #### yourself up and you end up in a really dark place.

MIKA-cover-album.jpg

 

“One thing I will say ¬and said even back then – and nothing has changed in this regard ¬– is that the concept of coming out is a very dangerous one because it is not the most in-depth thing. It’s like a firecracker that goes off. Then what happens afterwards? Sexuality and identity have been the ingredients of my music and lyrics since the beginning. It was always there. It’s just that my figuring out was done in a different way and under a lot of pressure, a lot of negative pressure, which was the worst possible thing that could be done. What was the point?”

 

LGBT activists wanted Mika to be a poster boy, I replied.

“But they already had me. Just read my lyrics. I’m still very private about my private life. Developing a sense of candidness takes time.”

Is Mika happier today then he was five years ago?

 

“I was happy then too,” Mika says. “Then, as now, I have the privilege of doing what I love. I’m really happy that I have the freedom to deal with the concept of sexuality, labels and breaking those preconceptions and how you are supposed to deal with it. I gave myself that freedom.”

 

Mika’s new album No Place in Heaven (Virgin EMI / Universal Music Canada) will be released on June 16. Mika then headlines Salle Wilfred-Pelletier at the Montreal International Jazz Festival on July 4 and 5.

 

RICHARD BURNETT

 

 

 

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http://www.wisconsingazette.com/music/mika-stops-hiding-with-no-place-in-heaven.html     Written by Jan Janssen, The Interview Feed Thursday, 27 August 2015 06:55   Mika stops hiding with ‘N

Washington Blade     https://www.washingtonblade.com/2015/07/09/mikas-magic-touch/   July 9, 2015 at 3:52 pm EDT | by Joey DiGuglielmo   Mika’s magic touch     Mika’s new album is his mo

Interview on Rage Monthly Magazine   http://content.yudu.com/Library/A3rk30/RageMonthlyMagazineS/resources/index.htm       To better see the interview here the images larger:      

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Thank you for sharing Eriko - nice "follow up" art. I really like it! -:)

No doubt that MIKA is very happy and pleased with his life now, which is soo good to know...-:)

 

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On the new issue of BillBoard Magazine (May 30, issue 127) there's a little Mika's interview at page 50

 

There's even a tweet from Republic Record about it

.@mikasounds talks to @billboard about the inspiration behind his new single #LastParty and embracing his quirks! https://pbs.twimg.com/media/CF8Yd2nWoAAxJ79.jpg

 

And here's the scan in HD

 

post-18139-0-45406100-1432668852.jpg

post-18139-0-45406100-1432668852_thumb.jpg

Edited by Lucrezia
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On the new issue of BillBoard Magazine (May 30, issue 127) there's a little Mika's interview at page 50

 

There's even a tweet from Republic Record about it

.@mikasounds talks to @billboard about the inspiration behind his new single #LastParty and embracing his quirks! https://pbs.twimg.com/media/CF8Yd2nWoAAxJ79.jpg

 

And here's the scan in HD

 

post-18139-0-45406100-1432668852.jpg

Third album? Oh well, never mind the mistake, it's very good! Anything written in English, that is about Mika is brilliant. Thanks for posting.

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Thank you sooo much Deb - this was lovely!!  :hug:  It seems like you'll have a lot more of MIKA in the US in the future - very promising reading for you... :wub: 

And I look forward to both MIKA designed shoes, and of course his books!! :thumb_yello:   It's really exciting to live in MIKA-world !! :yes:  :wub:  

 

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"I think back to the beginning of my career in the UK, and we’d go around and people would say “there’s no market for you here” or “there’s no need for you here," and so I went and created my own world, my own visuals, my own clothes, my own everything, because I was forced to. I look at America today and I feel the same. If there’s no platform for me, but I know that there’s people here for me, I’ll just have to invent my own. So that’s my next challenge"

I like this attitude very much, probably cause I can relate. Once you got what your real goals are, there's no giving up. 

Some wishes are misleading, when you finally get closer to them you realize that you don't belong there, then second thoughts are welcome and you better drop it cause it doesn't feel right anymore.

But when you really are focused on a goal, and it's the right one, you just find a way to it. And when it doesn't pan out, you'll find another way. You probably would have to bend a little, but you won't walk away. 

Quite a lot of self awareness and honesty is needed, though, to really claim to ourselves what our true purposes are. People don't necessarily have to get to know them, but it is fundamental that we do. 

 

 

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And here you can find the online version of BillBoard article with more questions

 

http://www.billboard.com/articles/columns/pop-shop/6576071/mika-freddie-mercury-simon-cowell-interview

That's absolutely fantastic. They mention so much good stuff, and Mika is right. There is more than one way to crack an egg. I'm excited about Mika going to have a residence in The States and that someone wants him to create a show. I hope all this will really happen!! I love how they mention the names of songs, so people can look them up, and that they remind people that Lollipop (from the PP2 movie) is Mika's song! It also seems like, even though his role in Z2 is only brief, they feature his songs, or maybe parts of some of them. Whatever it is, it's incredibly good publicity for Mika!!

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It seems the US gay press is really receptive to this new album, and Mika is getting a lot of exposure here suddenly. That's NOT a complaint! :naughty:

 

Here's another article, this one from OUT magazine, probably the best-known gay magazine in the US.

 

http://www.out.com/music/2015/5/28/mika-finds-new-happy-place-no-place-heaven

 

By Evan Ross Katz

 

You might say Mika has finally found his voice at 31. That's not to suggest it wasn’t there during his triumphant emergence onto the scene in 2007 (when he released his international hit “Grace Kelly”), and not to say it didn’t follow him through three critically praised records: Life in Cartoon Motion (2007), The Boy Who Knew Too Much (2009), and The Origin of Love (2012). But there’s always been a distinct guardedness about this singer/songwriter.

Now, ramping up to the June 16 release of his fourth album, No Place In Heaven, Mika is freeing himself from past fears and in doing so, delivering his most sophisticated, self-assured, yet whimsical, album to date.

 

 

Out: You described your first two albums as having a precocious, child-like quality, while the third album you described as more serious. How would you describe this album?

 

Mika: The fourth album is the result of a headspace that was a lot more positive—a lot more open. After the age of 30, I made a promise to myself to stop isolating myself so much, and to throw myself into things with a bit more of a care-free, candid attitude. I formed a little design studio with my sister and started drawing again like we used to in the kitchen of my mother’s house. I was basically liberating myself and making my brain work very hard—scaring myself with challenges. As a result, the album is direct, low-down, open, candid, playful, yet a mature pop album which takes its inspiration from '60s pop music, very much the way my first album did.

 

I​f we were looking at albums like high school, what would senior-year Mika tell freshman-year Mika about not just making records but about his career overall?
 

Buckle your seatbelt [Laughs]. For an artist like me–and I would explain this to myself if I had that Matthew McConaughey superpower, jumping through black holes and talking to myself when I’m younger–I would say, “Dare to be bold; dare to be different; dare to not fit in. If it has a reason for being, then it’s the right thing.”

 

How do you know if a song is finished?

If I don’t think of anything while I’m listening to it. I’m just kind of transported to the place where the song is trying to take me. Of course, I’ve got to be honest with you, once the record is finished I never listen to it ever again. I can’t listen to my own albums because they all feel unfinished. That’s why I always have so much fun performing because the songs are like living things that happen to be captured a certain way on the album, but on stage they evolve with you and with your audience.

 

The song “Good Guys” really stands out, repeatedly asking the question, “Where have all the gay guys gone?” Can you talk to me about this song?
 

I found myself in very big business—commercial sessions in big studios my first week of writing for the album. I looked around and said, “My god, you guys basically write most of the pop music in the world.” And they were all eating takeout, two of them had just been to the gym, and I looked at them a minute and said, “That’s great, but… where have all the gay guys gone? And they looked at me kind of blank-faced. But really, where have they all gone in the tin-pan alley part of pop music—the writing and the production? I found it funny. They didn’t find it funny at all.

As I sat down to write, I thought about that conversation and realized it wasn’t as jokey or as dumb as it sounded. It was almost like a message to myself. Where are the people that inspired me when I was 15-years-old, all these heroes that I held up so high? Where are they now? Why can’t I truly dare to be like them? How do I capture that? How do I be in the canon of those men that truly lived their lives without feeling consequences even if they had to deal with them? It was an exciting moment for me thinking, Okay, I’ll do it. I’ll go there. Let me try to be like the person I always wished I’d have the courage to be when I was younger. The answer is not the objective; It’s the process of asking and the self-confrontation.

 

Where do you think the music industry sits on the queer acceptance spectrum?

Since the 1950’s, music has been…well, forget the 1950’s. Since the 1700’s, music has been one of the few places where, even with an intolerant society, there's been freedom of expression. Even if it had to be more nuanced in certain cultures, and more discreet, music always gave an out—an opportunity for political and socio-political acceptance as far as sexuality is concerned. I still believe that is very much the case today. It’s an area where people can discover themselves as writers and as listeners. You can discover yourself as a fan of what you listen to. I’m an optimist and I truly believe that music as a medium is an incredibly tolerant art form.

 

Now, from a media perspective, it’s a different thing. I think it’s very good and I think it’s getting a lot better. There’s still further to go, and I’m very cognizant of that. Within mainstream media, the ideal is a non-reactivity and not even a mention. So, no matter the sexuality or the sex that a singer is singing about in a love song for example, it will not affect the format that the song will fall into—it will not infringe upon any part of one's commercial success or exposure. I think the way to get there is great music.

 

There’s a segment on this NPR podcast that I love called Pop Culture Happy Hour where they go around the table and share what’s making them happy that particular week. What’s making you happy this week?

Something quite amazing happened, actually. We are inevitably hardened by our daily lives, and we all have a certain patina even if we socially behave in a way to deny it...we still have that hardened patina when it comes to the outside world and protecting our emotions. You can see people protecting themselves and I do it too. During my show at Webster Hall this past week, I would look at people and see that their faces had changed– they were open, no longer guarding themselves in their body language against anybody around them. They were receiving and giving in equal measure. That candidness and that sense of openness was both inspiring and rejuvenating. It made me really happy to remind myself of the effect of the music on actual people in front of me. That made me really happy.

 

No Place In Heaven is Out June 16. 

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Hurrey, hurrey - this is wonderful, and topp promotion!!   :thumb_yello:  :yes:  Our golden MIKA is getting HOT in the US - and I'm superhappy!!  :teehee:  :wub:  

 

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me

And about time too! I'm almost speachless!

Just in case anyone is thinking, "why is Marilyn so thrilled about US success, when she wants Mika to be successful in the UK?"

I'll explain...

In this United Kingdom of Great Britain, success in the US is a sure fired way to gain respect, and kudos in the UK.. For example, One Direction broke America, and we never heard the last of it. Suddenly their respect went up, even though they had been big in the UK. It's the same with Adele.

I wouldn't expect that Mika would be loved by everyone in the US, but I did hope that the gay community, in the US and the UK would get behind this record as it's so honest. Yet, at the same time, it appeals to straight people too. I think the album truly builds bridges, because it says, "okay, I'm gay, you are straight, but we're not so different." The songs could be covered by anyone, and still be relevant to the person singing it. They can touch the hearts of anyone, and teach anyone to let go of prejudice and inhibition.

Imagine a room full of gay and straight people, all singing with gusto. "Where have all the gay guys gone?"

This is what happens with Mika.

Now that he's more open, he's really blossomed, so any buzz around him in the US will happen in the UK too. UK and USA are so much linked together in the music world, and the articles are in English, and British people can be lazy about anything in another language. They couldn't care less about Mika's success in Italy and France, but the US is another thing entirely.

All that being said, some success in the US will help Mika's career, even in ways that success in the UK couldn't. There's more opportunities ( as he has said) for his songs to be in the big Hollywood movies that will be seen (and heard) worldwide, or the big US TV shows that are shown everywhere.

This could be Mika's golden key to true iconic status in the world. I am absolutely thrilled by how things are going right now! 

Edited by Marilyn Mastin
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And about time too! I'm almost speachless!

Just in case anyone is thinking, "why is Marilyn so thrilled about US success, when she wants Mika to be successful in the UK?"

I'll explain...

In this United Kingdom of Great Britain, success in the US is a sure fired way to gain respect, and kudos in the UK.. For example, One Direction broke America, and we never heard the last of it. Suddenly their respect went up, even though they had been big in the UK. It's the same with Adele.

I wouldn't expect that Mika would be loved by everyone in the US, but I did hope that the gay community, in the US and the UK would get behind this record as it's so honest. Yet, at the same time, it appeals to straight people too. I think the album truly builds bridges, because it says, "okay, I'm gay, you are straight, but we're not so different." The songs could be covered by anyone, and still be relevant to the person singing it. They can touch the hearts of anyone, and teach anyone to let go of prejudice and inhibition.

Imagine a room full of gay and straight people, all singing with gusto. "Where have all the gay guys gone?"

This is what happens with Mika.

Now that he's more open, he's really blossomed, so any buzz around him in the US will happen in the UK too. UK and USA are so much linked together in the music world, and the articles are in English, and British people can be lazy about anything in another language. They couldn't care less about Mika's success in Italy and France, but the US is another thing entirely.

All that being said, some success in the US will help Mika's career, even in ways that success in the UK couldn't. There's more opportunities ( as he has said) for his songs to be in the big Hollywood movies that will be seen (and heard) worldwide, or the big US TV shows that are shown everywhere.

This could be Mika's golden key to true iconic status in the world. I am absolutely thrilled by how things are going right now! 

 

 

Thank you dear Marilyn!!  :hug:  As usual you explain everything so right and well  :wub:  MIKA really SHINES in the performances we've seen this month - and I suppose he'll conquer Europe during his tour, this summer and autumn! :wub:  And I do hope, and pray,  that UK will follow up now, with inviting him to interviews, in newpapers and mags, and by asking him to  give small promoting TV performances etc :fisch: .This could well  lead to many kind of gigs,  around  in the UK :)  I really think people need MIKAs  lovely and peaceful messages, given through the songs :)  In this world, full of conflicts and wars, he creates warm and peaceful hearts, full of joy... :wub:

 

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Another article about Mika and "Good Guys":

 

http://www.slate.com/blogs/outward/2015/05/27/mika_s_good_guys_video_has_a_powerful_gay_message.html

 

Mika Sings a Hymn to Gay History in New Single “Good Guys”

 

By J. Bryan Lowder

 

mika.jpg.CROP.promovar-mediumlarge.jpg

 

It might be because I recently published a long meditation on gay male culture and history, but damn if Mika’s new single “Good Guys” and the accompanying video doesn’t have me a little teary in the office today. The bittersweet song, which is from the openly gay artist’s fourth studio album No Place in Heaven (out June 16), is a psalm of pining for the gay past, explicitly so—the first stanza ends by asking “Where have all the gay guys gone?”

 

Mika’s skill as a songwriter is on full display here in a gorgeous arrangement benefiting from lush string, piano, and children’s choir writing. But the real draw is the song’s lyrical construction. Mika clarifies that he’s not just nostalgic for the heady days of pre-AIDS gay liberation (“It’s not the cowboys that I’m missing anymore/ That problem was already old in ’94”), but instead looking back to a time when gay men saw themselves as having something special to offer to the mainstream, or at the very least to each other. He acknowledges that gay exceptionalism is out of fashion these days (“Don’t be offended, this might seem a little wrong”), but then repurposes a line of Oscar Wilde’s into a moving hymn to the power and insight that can come from oppression: “If we are all in the gutter, it doesn’t change who we are/ cause some of us in the gutter are looking up at the stars.”

 

The most touching part of the song is Mika’s séancelike summoning—“To all my heroes that were dressed up in gold/ only hopin’ one day I could be so bold”—of all the gay figures that have inspired him: W.H. Auden, James Dean, Walt Whitman, Cole Porter, and Jean Cocteau, among others. This pantheon comes after a striking bit of songcraft, in which Mika shifts “gay guys” to “good guys” in his question, insisting on the still-powerful equivalence “gay is good.”

 

The video, a stately contemporary dance number, is a perfect match for the song. Mika is moved around like a doll through a number of different personas by the dance troupe: a straight-laced businessman, a queen, an astronaut, and a prisoner sentenced to hard labor—probably a reference to Wilde’s debilitating time behind bars for “gross indecency.” Indeed, much of the choreography communicates a tension between external constraints and a desire to escape—a struggle all too familiar to the gay men Mika misses, and to many of his contemporaries today.  

 

 

J. Bryan Lowder is a Slate associate editor. He writes and edits for Outward, Slate’s LGBTQ section, and for the culture section.

Edited by charlie20
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Another article about Mika and "Good Guys":
 
http://www.slate.com/blogs/outward/2015/05/27/mika_s_good_guys_video_has_a_powerful_gay_message.html
 
Mika Sings a Hymn to Gay History in New Single “Good Guys”
 
By J. Bryan Lowder
 
mika.jpg.CROP.promovar-mediumlarge.jpg
 
It might be because I recently published a long meditation on gay male culture and history, but damn if Mika’s new single “Good Guys” and the accompanying video doesn’t have me a little teary in the office today. The bittersweet song, which is from the openly gay artist’s fourth studio album No Place in Heaven (out June 16), is a psalm of pining for the gay past, explicitly so—the first stanza ends by asking “Where have all the gay guys gone?”

Mika’s skill as a songwriter is on full display here in a gorgeous arrangement benefiting from lush string, piano, and children’s choir writing. But the real draw is the song’s lyrical construction. Mika clarifies that he’s not just nostalgic for the heady days of pre-AIDS gay liberation (“It’s not the cowboys that I’m missing anymore/ That problem was already old in ’94”), but instead looking back to a time when gay men saw themselves as having something special to offer to the mainstream, or at the very least to each other. He acknowledges that gay exceptionalism is out of fashion these days (“Don’t be offended, this might seem a little wrong”), but then repurposes a line of Oscar Wilde’s into a moving hymn to the power and insight that can come from oppression: “If we are all in the gutter, it doesn’t change who we are/ cause some of us in the gutter are looking up at the stars.”
 
The most touching part of the song is Mika’s séancelike summoning—“To all my heroes that were dressed up in gold/ only hopin’ one day I could be so bold”—of all the gay figures that have inspired him: W.H. Auden, James Dean, Walt Whitman, Cole Porter, and Jean Cocteau, among others. This pantheon comes after a striking bit of songcraft, in which Mika shifts “gay guys” to “good guys” in his question, insisting on the still-powerful equivalence “gay is good.”
 
The video, a stately contemporary dance number, is a perfect match for the song. Mika is moved around like a doll through a number of different personas by the dance troupe: a straight-laced businessman, a queen, an astronaut, and a prisoner sentenced to hard labor—probably a reference to Wilde’s debilitating time behind bars for “gross indecency.” Indeed, much of the choreography communicates a tension between external constraints and a desire to escape—a struggle all too familiar to the gay men Mika misses, and to many of his contemporaries today.  
 
 
J. Bryan Lowder is a Slate associate editor. He writes and edits for Outward, Slate’s LGBTQ section, and for the culture section.


Thank you so much Charlie20!! -:) It's such a pleasure to be a devoted MIKA fan these days, with all these lovely articles coming up !!
I feel like I'm walking on pink clouds - sooo happy :-) :-)

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