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we have pictures and videos threads about mika in lebanon...i thought of starting a thread about press articles...cause we might have many.

this one i got from Google Alert.

 

Pop star Mika to play 'home town' Beirut

 

BEIRUT (AFP) — International pop singing sensation Mika is set to play to a sell-out crowd on Sunday when he stages his first concert in Beirut, the city of his birth.

 

"This is quite a proud moment for me," Mika, 25, told reporters on Saturday. "This concert has been a long time coming and finally it's taking place."

 

He has tried before to bring what he calls his "travelling circus" to Lebanon, but had to cancel because of the 2006 Israel-Hezbollah war and the political violence that has afflicted the country over the past two years.

 

"We have all tried a lot to make this happen and I am really looking forward to it," the London-based singer told a news conference.

 

More than 10,000 tickets have been sold so far and some 15,000 people are expected to throng Martyrs' Square in the heart of Beirut for the open-air concert.

 

"I don't think we are going to have any risk of having a bad crowd. I have seen two concerts in Beirut and they have been completely insane. I am really looking forward to this time being my turn," Mika said.

 

"You can expect to see a show that is quite celebratory. We're going to have fun," he added.

 

Mika's mother is Lebanese, his father is American and he speaks with a British accent. His family moved to Paris when he was very young and later to London, where he was raised.

 

"Anyone who is any part Lebanese will tell you the same thing -- that the Lebanese completely takes over," said Mika, who won the British Breakthrough Act award in the annual Brits music awards in London in February.

 

"I was always very proud of where I came from and who I am, and being Lebanese is a big part of that."

 

Mika's concert is a highlight of Lebanon's music festival season during a summer that has also seen the start of a revival for the country's tourism industry, badly hit over the past two years.

 

The organisers of the Beiteddine and Baalbek festivals are co-sponsoring the concert by Mika, who shot to fame in 2007 with his first album of Freddie Mercury-style 80s pop.

Hosted by Copyright © 2008 AFP. All rights reserved. More »

 

http://afp.google.com/article/ALeqM5gYc4HAAmcfHZk1lXttZunzQPglWA

 

scroll down the thread to find more articles!

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oh!:shocked:

so maybe it was already posted!

 

mods...feel free to delete this thread, if redundant :thumb_yello:

 

oh noo

it is not redundant

 

internet is redundant.... i thought press agency are just for picture... now press agency write an article and the article is clonate...

 

journalists dont do their job

:thumbdown:

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Festival rekindles Lebanon's cultural life

Saturday, Jul 26, 2008

The stage is under construction again at the edge of the Roman temple of Bacchus as the festival of Baalbeck, the oldest in the Middle East, comes back to life, taking advantage of a rare summer of calm in Lebanon.

 

Resurrected in 1996 after the end of a 15-year-sectarian war, the Baalbeck international festival was cancelled again in 2006, when war broke out between the Shia Hizbollah group and Israel on July 13, the festival's opening day.

 

Last year too, the show was stopped as Lebanon was wracked by conflict between the Lebanese army and a Sunni Islamist group holed up in a camp in the north of the country.

 

Until a few months ago, the organisers feared this would be another lost year.

 

"We weren't sure whether there would be a festival but we were having contacts with artists just in case a miracle happened," says Joseph Chemali, vice-president of the festival. "Then a miracle did happen."

 

After the Shia Hizbollah movement briefly took over Sunni parts of Beirut, a power-sharing deal was struck that enhanced the group's authority in government. The threat of war receded, at least temporarily.

 

Although the festival season is now in full swing - Baalbeck's shows start next week with classical music concerts, Brazilian jazz and the Arab diva Warda al-Jazayria - reviving Lebanon's cultural life is an uphill battle.

 

"We face two kinds of insecurity," says Mr Chemali. "Political and military insecurity is one and financial insecurity is another."

 

While Lebanon's political factions have been squabbling and its economy struggling, the booming nearby states of the Gulf have taken a keen interest in cultural events. Thanks to their deep pockets, they are now threatening to drive traditional cultural festivals in the region out of the market for pop artists.

 

The highest booking fee a Lebanese organiser can pay is just $250,000 (£125,000, €159,000), forcing all three summer festivals - Baalbeck, Beiteddine, and Byblos - to join forces to lure Mika, the Lebanese-born pop singer, back to Beirut to stage his show tomorrow at Martyrs' Square in the heart of the capital.

 

"The Gulf is trying to create an image. We already have an image and we're trying to find ways to compete on money through partnerships with international festivals," says Mr Chemali.

 

Unlike the Gulf, the Baalbeck festival also has to deal with politics. The Roman temples present a magical setting but the site lies in a stronghold of the Hizbollah group and the area has been known as the grounds of militant training camps.

 

Although some Hizbollah members in Baalbeck are offended by the festival - and the serving of alcohol during the evening events - the party's position is generally co-operative, largely because the shows portray a different image of the town.

 

"It's the only thing that puts Baalbeck on the map, so everyone likes it," says Issam Yaghi, a local official.

 

"The party [Hizbollah] doesn't mind. They're pragmatic about it and they even complain that the festival is not bringing big enough names to attract even more attention."

 

Local officials hope the festival will promote tourism to the Roman site but there is no tourism infrastructure in rundown Baalbeck. The only decorations, moreover, are Hizbollah flags, portraits of leaders and pictures of young men killed in battles with Israel.

 

That the festival organisers are pragmatic too has helped establish a working relationship: the people of Baalbeck are invited to attend dress rehearsals of Arabic shows for a symbolic fee, which is then turned over to the municipality.

 

The festival also offers its setting, with a stage, sound and light and the seating arrangements, to the municipality for two evenings so it can put up its own cultural programmes.

 

Meanwhile, Hizbollah can turn its propaganda machine on for the festival season. At the entrance to the Roman ruins, the party has set up a "museum" that is, these days, dedicated to the 2006 war with Israel.

 

Selling CDs and DVDs of speeches by Sayyed Hassan Nasrallah, its chief, the museum also displays a day-by-day picture gallery of the war, with the number of Israeli strikes and Lebanese deaths carefully recorded. One part of the museum is dedicated to commemorating the "martyrs" from Baalbeck who died in the war.

 

The museum even has its own artistic offering. On a recent day, it was playing a song celebrating the return of Samir Kuntar, the Lebanese militant who spent 30 years in jail and was released this month in a prisoner swap.

 

By Roula Khalaf in Baalbeck

 

© Copyright The Financial Times Ltd 2008.

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Pop star Mika to play 'home town' Beirut

Sat Jul 26, 2:29 PM ET

 

BEIRUT (AFP) - International pop singing sensation Mika is set to play to a sell-out crowd on Sunday when he stages his first concert in Beirut, the city of his birth.

 

"This is quite a proud moment for me," Mika, 25, told reporters on Saturday. "This concert has been a long time coming and finally it's taking place."

 

He has tried before to bring what he calls his "travelling circus" to Lebanon, but had to cancel because of the 2006 Israel-Hezbollah war and the political violence that has afflicted the country over the past two years.

 

"We have all tried a lot to make this happen and I am really looking forward to it," the London-based singer told a news conference.

 

More than 10,000 tickets have been sold so far and some 15,000 people are expected to throng Martyrs' Square in the heart of Beirut for the open-air concert.

 

"I don't think we are going to have any risk of having a bad crowd. I have seen two concerts in Beirut and they have been completely insane. I am really looking forward to this time being my turn," Mika said.

 

"You can expect to see a show that is quite celebratory. We're going to have fun," he added.

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The Middle East sings, and sometimes listens, throughout the summer

Daily Star staff

Friday, July 11, 2008

 

BEIRUT: The summer season is synonymous with music festivals in the MENA region. This week witnessed high-profile concert action from Morocco to Jordan and beyond, with the nature of the concert experience varying depending on the host country's political environment.

 

In Lebanon, where all hands are still vibrating in the wake of Patti Smith's hard-hitting and melodic Tuesday night show at Byblos, concert-goers are awaiting the opening shows of the Beiteddine and Baalbek festivals. While Byblos was on schedule last year, Baalbek and Beiteddine fell victim to unrest in the aftermath of Israel's month-long 2006 summer bombardment.

 

Beiteddine opens this Saturday with a show by Moroccan diva Karima Skalli. Expat pop sensation Mika will open the Baalbek Festival, in Beirut incongruously enough, on July 27.

Morocco has become a music festival hub in the last few years, hosting a succession of events throughout the spring and summer. The desert town of Essaouira is now cleaning up after the town's 11th Gnawa and Music of the World Festival, which opened on June 26.

 

The festival brought together traditional Gnawa musicians - descendants of slaves originating from sub-Saharan Africa who established musical-mystical brotherhoods throughout Morocco - with international pop and jazz musicians to perform at 10 concert venues around the town.

 

Despite the manifold difficulties involved in entering and traveling around occupied Palestine, Ramallah too is somehow becoming a significant venue for top-flight performance. The city hosted Turkey's folkloric dance troupe Fire of Anatolia and their male associates Sultans of the Dance on Tuesday.

 

Then it was time for a bit of Rai, as Algerian-born French vocalist Faudel took the Ramallah stage Wednesday night. Faudel is a dogged performer: At the border between the Occupied West Bank and Jordan, he and his entourage faced a five-hour wait at the Israeli-controlled Allenby Bridge checkpoint.

 

Jbeil played host to another concert Tuesday evening, as the UAE's Ruweida al-Mahruqi, Tunis' Ahmad al-Sharif and Lebanon's Haifa Wehbe, Wael Kfouri and Carole Samaha came together for the Sea of Stars dinner.

 

 

In Amman, meanwhile, Jordanian officials say that singers have joined its controversial music festival, despite claims it is being organized by the same company that oversaw Israel's 60th anniversary celebrations in May.

 

The month-long Jordan Festival kicked off Tuesday, Tourism Board chief Nayef Fayez told AFP. "The audience exceeded our expectations and we ran out of tickets for some concerts."

 

Such performers as Jordan's Omar Abdallat, Lebanon's Elissa and Syria's George Wassouf performed in the northern Greco-Roman city of Jerash, concert-goers said, while Canadian jazz vocalist Diana Krall performed at the Roman Citadel in downtown Amman.

 

The country's 14 Islamist-dominated professional trade unions and the Islamic Action Front had urged the government to cancel the festival and called on Arab singers to boycott it. They claimed that Publicis Groupe, which has allegedly orchestrated events for the 60th anniversary of the creation of the state of Israel, was organizing the festival.

 

Both the Jordanian state and Publicis have denied the claims.

 

"We have overcome this boycott issue," Fayez said. "We did not receive any official letter from any artist or singer about plans to boycott the festival."

 

For conscientious Arabs, the state of Israel was created - premised, in fact - on the occupation of Palestinian land. The Jordan Artists Association had announced that several Arab singers would boycott the festival, which will feature tenor Placido Domingo and award-winning Lebanese-born singer Mika.

 

Although Jordan and Israel are bound by a 1994 peace treaty, many Jordanians are opposed to normalization of ties with the Jewish state. - The Daily Star with AFP

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Saturday, 26 July 2008

 

Due to play a sold out gig in Beirut's Martyrs' Square

Pop star Mika heads for home town of Lebanon

 

Mika's has a Lebanese mother and an American father (File)

BEIRUT (AFP)

 

International pop singing sensation Mika is set to play to a sell-out crowd on Sunday when he stages his first concert in Beirut, the city of his birth.

 

"This is quite a proud moment for me," Mika, 25, told reporters on Saturday. "This concert has been a long time coming and finally it's taking place."

 

He has tried before to bring what he calls his "traveling circus" to Lebanon, but had to cancel because of the 2006 Israel-Hezbollah war and the political violence that has afflicted the country over the past two years.

 

"We have all tried a lot to make this happen and I am really looking forward to it," the London-based singer told a news conference.

 

More than 10,000 tickets have been sold so far and some 15,000 people are expected to throng Martyrs' Square in the heart of Beirut for the open-air concert.

 

"I don't think we are going to have any risk of having a bad crowd. I have seen two concerts in Beirut and they have been completely insane. I am really looking forward to this time being my turn," Mika said.

 

"You can expect to see a show that is quite celebratory. We're going to have fun," he added.

 

Mika's mother is Lebanese, his father is American and he speaks with a British accent. His family moved to Paris when he was very young and later to London, where he was raised.

 

"Anyone who is any part Lebanese will tell you the same thing -- that the Lebanese completely takes over," said Mika, who won the British Breakthrough Act award in the annual Brits music awards in London in February.

 

"I was always very proud of where I came from and who I am, and being Lebanese is a big part of that."

Mika's concert is a highlight of Lebanon's music festival season during a summer that has also seen the start of a revival for the country's tourism industry, badly hit over the past two years.

 

The organizers of the Beiteddine and Baalbek festivals are co-sponsoring the concert by Mika, who shot to fame in 2007 with his first album of Freddie Mercury-style 80s pop.

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GULF TIMES

Pop star Mika set for Beirut concert

Published: Sunday, 27 July, 2008, 01:33 AM Doha Time

 

Singer Mika addresses a press conference in Beirut yesterday

BEIRUT: International pop singing sensation Mika is set to play to a sell-out crowd today when he stages his first concert in Beirut, the city of his birth.

“This is quite a proud moment for me,” Mika, 25, told reporters yesterday. “This concert has been a long time coming and finally it’s taking place.”

He has tried before to bring what he calls his “travelling circus” to Lebanon, but had to cancel because of the 2006 Israel-Hezbollah war and the political violence that has afflicted the country over the past two years.

“We have all tried a lot to make this happen and I am really looking forward to it,” the London-based singer told a news conference.

More than 10,000 tickets have been sold so far and some 15,000 people are expected to throng Martyrs’ Square in the heart of Beirut for the open-air concert.

“I don’t think we are going to have any risk of having a bad crowd. I have seen two concerts in Beirut and they have been completely insane. I am really looking forward to this time being my turn,” Mika said.

“You can expect to see a show that is quite celebratory. We’re going to have fun,” he added.

Mika’s mother is Lebanese, his father is American and he speaks with a British accent. His family moved to Paris when he was very young and later to London, where he was raised.

“Anyone who is any part Lebanese will tell you the same thing - that the Lebanese completely takes over,” said Mika, who won the British Breakthrough Act award in the annual Brits music awards in London in February.

“I was always very proud of where I came from and who I am, and being Lebanese is a big part of that.”

The organisers of the Beiteddine and Baalbek festivals are co-sponsoring the concert by Mika, who shot to fame in 2007 with his first album of Freddie Mercury-style 80s pop. - AFP

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US-Lebanese singer relaxes fans in downtown Beirut

Posted : Sun, 27 Jul 2008 20:57:00 GMT

 

Beirut - Mika, the so-called genius of pop music, enchanted late Sunday some 14,000 of his Lebanese fans in down town Beirut by singing his famous song Relax, Take It Easy. Mika, whose real name is Michael Penniman and was born in Beirut from a Lebanese mother and an American father, returned to the city after he was forced to leave it at the outbreak of Lebanon's civil war in 1975-1990.

As he entered the stage he addressed the crowd in Arabic language.

"Hello, I am very happy to be here in Lebanon," he said and waved a Lebanese flag.

Young Lebanese children wearing T-shirts that read "Mika all of Lebanon loves you" gathered at the so-called Martyr square in downtown Beirut, which usually gathers political rallies, were overjoyed to see their favorite singer singing and performing on stage.

Mika, who resides in London has often been compared to Robbie Williams, Scissor Sisters and Freddy Mercury. His first album Life in Cartoon Motion introduces such songs as Grace Kelly, Relax, Take it Easy and Love Today and has beaten all records in Europe and the United States.

"Mika's four Octaves voice drove us wild throughout the concert," said one of Mika's Lebanese fans, Tara Attaya.

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Colourful doesn't even begin to describe Mika's world.

By Kelly Crane, Staff Reporter

Published: July 27, 2008, 23:49

 

<<In beirut, Mika talks exclusively to Tabloid! about his colourful life, pesky love handles and returning to Lebanon

 

Colourful doesn't even begin to describe Mika's world. Granted, the world has witnessed the obvious clues — the bright clothes, child-like jewellery and crazy antics on stage.

 

But meet him face-to-face and it's easy to see the colour comes from somewhere far deeper than many could imagine.

 

Speaking exclusively to tabloid! just hours before his highly-anticipated first concert in Lebanon — his birthplace — Mika, a bundle of positive energy, vibes and enthusiasm, spoke openly about everything from nuts to new underwear.

 

Looking anything but inconspicuous in a striking navy and white striped jacket, the 6ft pop sensation lit up the room, his curly locks shaping his face, softening a huge smile.

 

And then came the colour.

 

Firstly in the form of his family who outdid him in the colour stakes, namely his mother who wore a luminous orange dress and his sister in a fuchsia pink trouser and shirt combo.

 

But secondly, and perhaps more importantly, in the form of a child/boy/man who has clearly struggled — and is still struggling — with a world which he finds hard to understand.

 

He exudes colour through his music, personality and outlook on life, a conscious decision he claims has shaped who he is today.

 

Between reality and fantasy

"I write songs in order to process things in my life. You can say something in a song which you just can't get away with saying to someone's face — unless you want to get smacked in the mouth."

 

Stuck somewhere between reality and a fantasy, cartoon-like world, Mika now says the three-dimensional colour and imagination we all know and love from his catchy melodies, bright music videos and breathtaking live shows allow him to express his views and thoughts in a positive and fun way.

 

"Even if I'm singing about somewhere quite dark and depressing, I believe this parallel universe allows me to approach everything in a fun and happy way. The alternative would be to get dragged down by negativity."

 

Mika's early years were difficult. The singer forgot how to read and write and stopped talking for weeks on end.

 

Born in Beirut in the mid-80s, Mika's family found themselves having to move to Paris at the height of the civil war.

 

His father was taken hostage and held at the American embassy in Kuwait before being released and taking his family to settle in London.

 

"It was a combination of moving as well as a horrible time at school for the first few years in London that lead me to stop talking, reading and writing.

 

"I was pulled out of school for six months in order to sort myself out and find a new school and this was when I remember music really becoming important to me. It got me back on my feet."

 

A self-taught piano virtuoso, gymnastic vocalist and born entertainer, Mika says by the age of nine he knew songwriting was his destiny.

 

"After I started singing as a boy I started getting jobs everywhere. With the help of a terrifyingly tough Russian singing teacher I became quite good and did everything from recordings with the Royal Opera House to the Orbit chewing gum jingle.

 

"I'll never forget calling up British Airways to get a ticket only to be placed in a line listening to my own voice — it was a painful eight minutes.

 

"I think the main reason I was getting so much work was because I was insanely cheap. My mother and I had no idea how much I was supposed to get paid. Looking back I think 45 quid for the chewing gum jingle could have been a little too cheap."

 

Up against the on-going fighting, political disruption and concerns over safety, this concert trip was third time lucky for Mika, who says he was "dying to get to Lebanon" to perform for the people he considers family.

 

'Lebanon's my home'

"This is a concert which has fallen through a number of times and you have no idea how pleased I am that it is finally going ahead. I was born here and have what feels like hundreds of cousins here.

 

"My mother lives here and I consider it home in many ways. I tell everyone I can of my Lebanese heritage and even though I have never really lived here I don't think it matters.

 

"I was brought up in a Lebanese household and I don't underplay that. I am not scared about being in Lebanon — admittedly my crew were a little apprehensive but that is natural."

 

So the cartoon world Mika created as a child has stayed with him and now is transported into circus-like antics and atmopshere on stage, unique choreography and foot-tapping tunes which just cannot be ignored — even if you try.

 

"I think my perfomances are theatrical as a way of escaping. I hide in my music and try to take all the negative influences and make them positive.

 

"The cartoon came from being 'placeless' for so long. Moving around all the time meant I didn't know where I belonged.

 

"I think I felt I didn't have a home so I would just create my own where everything was colourful and happy. And it worked."

 

Mostly written about his family and life experiences, Mika credits his child-like curiosity as his main inspiration and influence when it comes to writing songs.

 

"Some of messages are really quite dark but I think they are made even more powerful by the fact they are presented in a catchy pop melody.

 

"Sometimes when I'm on stage it feels weird to watch a five-year-old singing along to Love Today because it's about a hooker in Miami.

 

"I sometimes look down and think I hope you don't understand these lyrics — well at least until you're 12.

 

"But the joy of the music is people can look as little or as deeply into the lyrics as they wish."

 

With plans to spend his birthday on August 18 mountain climbing in France, and endless fat-burning dance routines on stage you'd think Mika would have nothing to worry about when it comes to exercise and his weight. Think again.

 

"If there's one thing the world doesn't know about me it's that I have love handles. The world doesn't know about it because I didn't either. I love a drink or two but my trainer says the handles are appearing so I have to stop."

 

The young Mika wasn't to be found hunched over a radio under the bed sheets or seduced by the glitz of Top of the Pops. He was catapulted onto the stage by a Richard Strauss opera at the age of just 11.

 

"I've always done things differently without really knowing it. I wish I could say I was a self-imposed loner but it was imposed on me. But at the same time I lived in a magical world. A parallel universe for people that is illusory and enchanting and amazing."

 

For the last 12 years of his life Mika has followed his maxim of a parallel universe to its natural conclusion, which resulted in his dynamic, idiosyncratic debut album Life in Cartoon Motion.>>

 

To be continued.........

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<<Quitting college

 

"I grew up listening to everything from Joan Baez and Dylan, to Serge Gainsbourg and flamenco.

 

"My musical tastes have become more eclectic as I've got older but I always find myslef going back to great artist songwriters, people who make great records to their own vision — Prince, Harry Nilsson, Elton John and Michael Jackson. These people make amazing pop records which couldn't be performed by anyone else and that's what I always wanted to do."

 

However, it could have all been very different.

 

"At 19 I left home to study for an academic degree at the London School of Economics. But I quit on my first day and enrolled at the Royal College of Music two weeks later. What was I thinking?"

 

An obsessive songwriter as a student, he would gate-crash parties and take to the piano to deliver five-song sets unannounced and uninvited.

 

One such occasion led to an early development deal, which he now sees as essential to his progress as an artist but at the time saw a little short of spirit crushing.

"The bosses would try and twist me into a direction which went totally against my nature.

 

Basically they wanted me to follow whatever was popular at the time, which at that time was Craig David, so my depression was pretty deep.

 

Saved by the web

 

"My advice to people starting out now would be to use the internet for everything it can provide. It is an amazing resource and gives people opportunities they wouldn't have had before.

 

"I always credit a web blog called PopBitch for some of my discovery. I went from having about 102 hits online of people listening to my music to near 50,000 in just over 24 hours. Just because they wrote something nice about me.

 

"It was incredible. People think your music is great when you are famous but the truth is my music was the same then — same songs, same album but nobody had heard it.

 

"And now I have the priviledge of being able to do things my way but anyone starting out also has the same freedom. You don't have to ask anyone's permission and you can do whatever is in your heart."

 

A family man, Mika now works along side his brothers and sisters who do everything from set design to running errands for their big brother. But extrovert they certainly aren't.

 

"My sister goes mad if anyone even tries to talk to her. We call her Whack because if you try and take a picture of her she will do it.

"My family is very close and I love that. We fight like normal families do but it is always OK in the end.

 

"I work with people I trust and they remained very tight-lipped about me which I like. We have people knocking on the door at home and all the rest but we don't speak because we are serious about music and not being famous. I want to put on a great show, not be a celebrity."

 

And the wheels only back up the above.

 

"I drive a Fiat 500 but I've just bought an Austin Healy 100 from 1952 which is so cool. But the irony of the whole thing is that I don't drive. It's great I can get driven around by my friends.

 

Behind the Big Girl

 

Curiosity (and a night in front of the television) along with an endearing quality to always see the good in things, brought about Mika's number one hit Big Girl.

 

"I was watching a programme on Channel 4 in the UK about obesity in the US and it was incredibly dark. The tone of the documentary was very sarcastic and cutting towards fat people and it didn't sit right with me.

 

"Then they started interviewing the owner of a nightclub about two hours outside LA called The Butterfly Lounge, which was a nightclub specifically for larger ladies. Suddenly the whole tone of the documentary changed and became a pleasure to watch.

 

"These ladies were having a great time and it flicked something in me. There and then I wrote down the words ‘get yourself to the butterfly lounge and find yourself a big lady' and Big Girl was written in 15 minutes."

 

Mika's favourite things

 

Superpower: To have sticky hands like Spiderman to climb up buildings.

 

Breakfast: Double espresso, hot milk, boiled egg (3 mins and 40 seconds), Ryvita, labneh, hummus and cucumber.

 

What makes you nervous? Everything.

Favourite film: Freaks by Tod Browning.

King for a day: I’d hold a medieval feast with a sacrificial animal.>>

 

 

 

http://archive.gulfnews.com/articles/08/07/27/10232202.html

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"My sister goes mad if anyone even tries to talk to her. We call her Whack because if you try and take a picture of her she will do it.

"My family is very close and I love that. We fight like normal families do but it is always OK in the end.

 

Err..mad? :blink: In what way? *Get's put off talking to Yasmine again* :naughty:

 

That's really sweet (about the second sentence) :wub2:

 

"I drive a Fiat 500 but I've just bought an Austin Healy 100 from 1952 which is so cool. But the irony of the whole thing is that I don't drive. It's great I can get driven around by my friends.

 

Hum.. was wondering since when he could drive, but now it makes sense. I was wondering what he was doing with his Fiat 500 :naughty:

 

Breakfast: Double espresso, hot milk, boiled egg (3 mins and 40 seconds), Ryvita, labneh, hummus and cucumber.

 

Well, there's your answer. You still want a blog about his breakfast? :naughty:

 

 

Awesome pics as well!!! :punk:

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