Jump to content

simon cowell rejected mika!!


rahim94
 Share

Recommended Posts

  • Replies 21
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Mika was only 14 when he met with Simon so you have to give the guy a break. He doesn't have a crystal ball and it's probably better that Mika worked on his music and waited until he was an adult to start getting the kind of attention he has received. Simon recently gave Mika props for his success so he's not a total fool!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

He is a producer and a powerful person in music business, has lots of connections... He is very opinionated and if he doesn't like you for any reason , he will say it to your face and not in a very pleasant manner. Quite rude, actually...

I don't think he is that stupid, many people in the business value his opinion, but the problem is that he seems to reject anything that is unusual. He only recognises mainstream music, anything that is marketable and easy to sell...

I think he actually new that Mika is talented, but was scared that he is too eccentric and too much of his own person. Mika would be difficult to brake, as he already knows what he wants... Simon is looking for people who would say - OK, do with me what you want, I'll sing anything you give me, I'll have any style you want. I don't think any of his clients write their own music, Simon tells them what to perform...

I'm glad Mika isn't working with him, as Simon would definitely try fit him in this X-factor box...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 year later...

TELEGRAPH.co.uk BLOGS

SIMON COWELL:

What exactly is his contribution to music?

Posted By: Neil McCormick at Oct 16, 2008 at 11:23:30 [General]

Posted in: Arts , Audio File

 

It has been rumoured that Simon Cowell is being considered for the Brit Awards Outstanding Contribution to Music. Now, Simon Cowell may have made outstanding contributions to many things - Saturday Night TV, the waist height of men's trousers, the retirement funds of lapdancers, the cabaret careers of former shop assistants and the coffers of professional teams of songwriters and producers who work behind the scenes on his machine tooled manufactured pop acts - but I am not sure that even he would claim that music (per se) is amongst them.

 

I met up with Simon earlier this week. Such are our differences of opinion about how to discover, nurture and make the most of great talent, that in my mind I always cast him as The Evil Emperor of Lowest Common Denominator Pop. But whenever our paths cross I am (like everyone else) immediately seduced by his charm and intelligence. I actually respect him and freely acknowledge his right to fill our record stores with crap. He has identified a market (that corresponds with his own very mainstream tastes in pop culture) and operates in it with enormous skill. But, by his own admission, he is not really in the music business. He is in the entertainment business. And there is a qualitative difference.

 

I don't want to get snobbish about it. There is great bottom line pop music. It can be cheesy, trashy and banal and still work 'cause it catches our ears and our hearts. But even in the most populist of genres, the really amazing stuff, full of character and emotion and craziness, rarely comes from the uber-manufactured school, where everything is assembled to exact specifications. It needs a little human wonkiness to burst through the confines of the genre and catch fire. But you can't pre-programme that. Which is why Simon is very good at creating a Leona Lewis or Westlife or Il Divo, but could never give us a Lily Allen, Keane, Mika ... or even a Madonna or Robbie Williams. And lets not start on The Beatles, The Beach Boys, Michael Jackson, Prince and ABBA, all those worldbeating pop groups whose music he pilfers for his Saturday Night X Factor productions.

 

Simon would like the music business to be more like the film business, where big studios find out what the audience want, and then give it to them, testing it all along the way to make sure they are satisfied with our product. He mentioned the success of Iron Man as an example of how well Hollywood does this (although one could counter with the mess that was The Incredible Hulk).

 

But I firmly believe that real greatness springs from the individual creativity and character of a great artist given license to express themselves. It is not about giving the public what they want. Its about giving the public what they didn't even know they needed.

 

The really worrying thing is that, traditionally the winner of the Outstanding Contribution to Music performs the closing set at the Brit Awards. Does this mean Simon is going to finally give us a song?

 

And can I be on the judging panel?

Edited by A. Clay
Link to comment
Share on other sites

TELEGRAPH.co.uk BLOGS

SIMON COWELL:

What exactly is his contribution to music?

Posted By: Neil McCormick at Oct 16, 2008 at 11:23:30 [General]

Posted in: Arts , Audio File

 

It has been rumoured that Simon Cowell is being considered for the Brit Awards Outstanding Contribution to Music. Now, Simon Cowell may have made outstanding contributions to many things - Saturday Night TV, the waist height of men's trousers, the retirement funds of lapdancers, the cabaret careers of former shop assistants and the coffers of professional teams of songwriters and producers who work behind the scenes on his machine tooled manufactured pop acts - but I am not sure that even he would claim that music (per se) is amongst them.

 

I met up with Simon earlier this week. Such are our differences of opinion about how to discover, nurture and make the most of great talent, that in my mind I always cast him as The Evil Emperor of Lowest Common Denominator Pop. But whenever our paths cross I am (like everyone else) immediately seduced by his charm and intelligence. I actually respect him and freely acknowledge his right to fill our record stores with crap. He has identified a market (that corresponds with his own very mainstream tastes in pop culture) and operates in it with enormous skill. But, by his own admission, he is not really in the music business. He is in the entertainment business. And there is a qualitative difference.

 

I don't want to get snobbish about it. There is great bottom line pop music. It can be cheesy, trashy and banal and still work 'cause it catches our ears and our hearts. But even in the most populist of genres, the really amazing stuff, full of character and emotion and craziness, rarely comes from the uber-manufactured school, where everything is assembled to exact specifications. It needs a little human wonkiness to burst through the confines of the genre and catch fire. But you can't pre-programme that. Which is why Simon is very good at creating a Leona Lewis or Westlife or Il Divo, but could never give us a Lily Allen, Keane, Mika ... or even a Madonna or Robbie Williams. And lets not start on The Beatles, The Beach Boys, Michael Jackson, Prince and ABBA, all those worldbeating pop groups whose music he pilfers for his Saturday Night X Factor productions.

 

Simon would like the music business to be more like the film business, where big studios find out what the audience want, and then give it to them, testing it all along the way to make sure they are satisfied with our product. He mentioned the success of Iron Man as an example of how well Hollywood does this (although one could counter with the mess that was The Incredible Hulk).

 

But I firmly believe that real greatness springs from the individual creativity and character of a great artist given license to express themselves. It is not about giving the public what they want. Its about giving the public what they didn't even know they needed.

 

The really worrying thing is that, traditionally the winner of the Outstanding Contribution to Music performs the closing set at the Brit Awards. Does this mean Simon is going to finally give us a song?

 

And can I be on the judging panel?

 

This is great stuff, absolutely spot on, it says everything one needs to know about Simon Cowell (and others of his ilk) and his approach to the industry.

 

Well done Mr. McCormick!

 

Thanks for posting Alice.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

at first simon said he wanted to take mika through them when simon heard him he said mika is no good and now he look stupid

Yes Simon is stupid. We all know that he wouldn't know talent if it... Walked out the door... But I think what happened with simon was a long time ago. Mika was trying to get signed when he was still just a boy. In a way, I'm glad he didn't get signed too quickly, and that he had to struggle for a while, becuae I really think his struggles have helped his music to be ultimately greater. Let's face it, if he had been signed years before he actually was, we wouldn't have Grace Kelly, because he wouldn't have written it!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share


×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Privacy Policy